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SIMMONS COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 

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in 2012 with funding from 

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http://archive.org/details/microcosm1910simm 



The Microcosm 




THE SIMMONS COLLEGE ANNUAL 
PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF 
SIMMONS COLLEGE 
BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS 



VOLUME 



ONE 



Simmons College 

Boston Massachusetts 

1910 



_) / ' 



i 







n 



Alumnae Association . 


26 


Athletics . . 


104 


1910 Basketball Squad 


105 


191 1 Basketball Squad 


106 


191 2 Basketball Squacl 


107 


1913 Basketball Squad 


108 


Calendar 1909-1910 


7 


Classes 




1910 ..... 


27 


1911 . . 


53 


1912 . . 


63 


1913 


72 


Specials 


79 


College Organizations 




Tbe Student Guild . 


82 


The Student Government Association 


84 


Vespers .... 


86 


Editorial Board, kjio Microcosm . 


88 


Glee Club .... 


90 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



Corporation . ... 


8 


Faculty ...... 


9 


Grinds: "The Simmons Dump" 


109 


History of the College 


25 


Instructors ..... 


17 


Prologue . . . 


4 


Social Events 




Social Calendar 1909-1910 


95 


Japanese Tea . . 


96 


Dartmouth Concert . . 


97 


Junior Dance ..... 


98 


1910 Junior Dance Committee 


99 


1910 Senior Dance Committee 


100 


Commencement Week 


IOI 




The Andover Press 
Andover, Massachusetts 




CALENDAR 




Sept. 


13- 


18 




Sept. 


20, 


21 




Sept. 


22 






Nov. 


24- 


Nov. 


29 


Dec. 


21 






Jan. 


4 






Feb. 


5 






Feb. 


7 






Feb. 


22 






Mar. 


24 






April 


5 






April 


19 






May 


30 






May 


3 1 ". 


June 


10 


June 


15 






June 


20- 


25 




July 


15 


Aug. 


13 



1909 

Entrance examinations. 

Registration and condition examinations. 

Opening of the college year. 

Thanksgiving recess. 

College closes at noon. 

Christmas Vacation 

1910 

College opens at 9 a.m. 
End of the first term. 
Opening of second term. 
Washington's birthday, a holiday. 
College closes at noon. 

Spring Vacation 

College opens at 9 a.m. 

Patriots' Day, a holiday. 

Memorial Day, a holiday. 

Final Examinations. 

Commencement Day. 

College Entrance Board Examinations. 

Summer Library class. 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 



Corporation 



Henry Lefavour, Ph.D., LL.D., Boston, President. 

Horatio Appleton Lamb, A.B., Milton, Treasurer 

John Washburn Bartol, A.B., M.D., Boston, Clerk. 

Frances Baker Ames, Boston. 

Frances Rollins Morse, Boston. 

Edgar Hamilton Nichols, A.B., Cambridge. 

William Thompson Sedgwick, Ph.D., Sc.D., Brookline. 

Joseph Bangs Warner, A.M., LL.B., Cambridge. 

Mary Morton Kehew, Boston. 

George Henry Ellis, West Newton. 

Marion McGregor Noyes, A.M., Winchester. 

Guy Lowell, A.B., S.B., Brookline. 

Robert Treat Paine, 2D, A.B., Brookline. 

Mary Eleanor Williams, ^'-ookline. 



%\t jpacultp 



HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL.D., 
President. Williams, '86; LL.D., Williams, 
'02, Tufts, '05. 

Additional course, University of Berlin. 

Instructor in Williston Seminary ; Professor 
and Dean of Williams College ; President of 
Simmons College from 1902. 

Phi Beta Kappa, Trustee Williams College, 
Trustee Boston State Hospital, Colonial So- 
ciety of Massachusetts, American Academy 
of Arts and Sciences, New England Historic 
Genealogical Society, American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, American 
Sociological Society, American Political Sci- 
ence Association, American Academy of 
Political and Social Science. Director Hale 
House Association, Executive Committee 
North Bennet Street Industrial School, St. 
Botolph Club, Boston City Club, City Club of 
New York. 

SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, A.M., Dean 

and Director of the School of Household 
Economics. State Normal School, Bridge- 
water, Mass. ; A.M., Tufts, '02. 

Principal of High School, Lisbon, N. H. ; 
Principal of Schools, St. Johnsbury, Vt., Prin- 
cipal of Training School, Saratoga Springs, 
N. Y. ; Supervisor of Schools, Boston, Mass.; 
Dean of Simmons College from 1902. 

Author of Stepping Stones to Literature 
with Supt. C. B. Gilbert, St. Paul, Minn., 
1897; The Mother Tongue with Professor 
George L. Kittredge, Harvard University, 
1900 ; Manual of Composition with Professor 
Kittredge and Professor Gardiner, Harvard 
University, 1902 ; Waymarks for Teachers, 
1894; With Pencil and Pen; Reading; Ho-a' 
To Teach It, 1889. 

Member of Massachusetts State Board of 
Education ; National Council of Education, 
N. E. A. ; Chairman New England Associa- 
tion of Home Economics. 





THE MICROCOSM 



1910 




JAMES F. NORRIS, A.B., Ph.D., Professor 
of Chemistry and Director of the School 
of Science. A.B., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, '92 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 

'95- 

Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry, 
M. I. T. ; Professor Chemistry from 1904. 

Author of about thirty papers on Inorganic 
Chemistry and Organic Chemistry in Ameri- 
can and German Chemical Journals. 

Phi Beta Kappa, Technology Club, Ameri- 
can Academy of Arts and Sciences, American 
Chemical Society, Die Deutsche Chemische 
Gesellschaft. 




ALFRED BULL NICHOLS, A.B., Profes- 
sor of German. A.B., Yale, '80. 




FRANK EDGAR FARLEY, A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., Professor of English. A.B., Har- 
vard University, '93 ; A.M., Harvard Uni- 
versity, '94; Ph.D., Harvard University, 

97- 

Assistant in English, Harvard University ; 
Assistant in English, Radcliffe ; Instructor in 
English, Haverford; Professor of English, 
Syracuse University ; Professor of English 
Simmons from 1903. 

Author of Scandinavian influences in the 
English Romantic Movement, 1903; editor of 
Milton's Paradise Lost, 1898. 



10 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



JEFFREY A. BRACKETT, A.B., Ph.D., 
Associate Professor of the Theory and 
Practice of Philanthropic Work, and Di- 
rector of the School for Social Workers. 
A.B., Harvard University, '83 ; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, '89. 

President Department Charities of Balti- 
more, Md. ; President National Conference of 
Charities and Correction ; Director of School 
for Social Workers, Boston, from 1904. 

Author of Supervision and Education in 
Charity, 1901. 

Massachusetts State Board of Charity. 




REGINALD RUSDEN GOODELL, A.B., 
A.M., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages. Bowdoin. 

Additional courses, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, The Sorbonne, Grenoble, L' Alliance 
Franchise. 

Instructor at Bowdoin; Instructor at M. I. 
T. ; Associate Professor from 1902. 

Editor of L'Enfant Espion and Other 
Stories. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Kappa Phi, 
Technology Club, Modern Language Asso- 
ciation, Salon Frangais de Boston. 




EDWARD H. ELDRIDGE, A.M., Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of Secretarial Studies 
and Director of the School of Secretarial 
Studies. Temple University, Philadelphia ; 
A.M., 03; Ph.D., 08. 

Additional courses, Amherst, Chicago Uni- 
versity, University of Pennsylvania. 

Secretary to College President ; Professor 
of Psychology, Temple College (now Uni- 
versity) ; Director School of Commerce, 
Temple College ; Director School of Secre- 
tarial Studies, Simmons, from 1902. 

Author of Hypnotism, 1902; Dictation 
Exercises, 1910. 




11 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 





MARY ESTHER ROBBINS, Assistant 

Professor of Library Science, Director of 
the School of Library Science, and Libra- 
rian. New York State Library School, 
1892. 

Librarian New Britain Institute, New 
Britain, Conn. ; Head Cataloguer, University 
of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb.; Library Organ- 
izer for five years in various libraries ; 
Director of Library School, Simmons, from 
1902. 

Author of articles in technical magazines. 

Member of the Council of the American 
Library Association, Fellow of the American 
Library Institute, Treasurer Mass. Library 
Club. 



MARIA WILLET HOWARD, Assistant 

Professor of Household Economics. Thayer 
Academy, Braintree, Mass. 



i 




KENNETH L. MARK, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Har- 
vard, A.B., 98; A.M., 00; Ph.D., '03. 

Assistant in Chemistry, Harvard Univer- 
sity ; Instructor in Chemistry, Simmons; 
Assistant Professor from 1906. 

Author of Thermal Expansion of Gases. 

Delta Upsilon, American Chemical Society. 



12 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



LESLIE LYLE CAMPBELL, A.M., Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor of Physics. Washing- 
ton and Lee; Harvard University. 
Professor of Physics, Westminster College ; 
Assistant Professor, Simmons, from 1905. 

Author of Thermal and Electrical Prop- 
erties of Metals in Proceedings of American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences; Thcrnw- 
magnctic Effect in Soft Iron, Physical Re- 
view. 

Member of American Physical Society, 
Fellow of American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science, Member National 
Geographical Society, Member Mathematical 
and Physical Club, Associate Member Eastern 
Association of Physics Teachers. 

SUSAN M. KINGSBURY, A.B., A.M., Ph. 
D., Assistant Professor of History and 
Economics. University of the Pacific, Cali- 
fornia, '90; A.M., Leland Stanford Junior 
University, '99; Ph.D., Columbia Univer- 
sity, '05. 

Teacher of History, San Francisco Lowell 
High School; Instructor in History, Vassar 
College ; Director of Investigation for Com- 
mission on Industrial Education. 

Author of Introduction to the Records of 
the Virginia Company; Relation of Children 
to Industry in Report of Massachusetts Com- 
mission on Industrial Education. 

Kappa Alpha Theta, General Committee 
of American Historical Association, Council 
of New England History Teachers Associa- 
tion. 





MARY E. PARKER, A.B., A.M., Assistant 
Professor of the Principles and Practice of 
Teaching. Wellesley College, '88; A.M., 
University of Pennsylvania, '98; A.M., 
Radcliffe, '99. 

Assistant, Gardner, Mass., High School; 
Supervisor in public schools of Altoona, Pa., 
and Syracuse, N. Y. ; Assistant Professor 
from 1905. 

National Education Association, Associa- 
tion of Collegiate Alumnae, New England 
College Teachers of Education, Social Edu- 
cation Club, Harvard Teachers Association, 
Twentieth Century Club. 




THE MICROCOSM 



1910 




PERCY GOLDTHWAIT STILES, S.B., 
Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, '97 ; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, '02. 

Instructor Bellevue Medical College ; In- 
structor, M. I. T., from 1903; Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Simmons, from 1907. 

Author of sundry scientific papers. 

Society of Experimental Biology and Medi- 
cine, American Physiological Society. 




ERXST HERMANN PAUL GROSSMAN, 
A.B., Assistant Professor of German. 
Berlin Normal College ; A.B., Harvard '02. 

Instructor at Harvard University ; Assist- 
ant Professor, Simmons. 




ORLANDO C. MOYER, B.C.S., Assistant 
Professor of Secretarial Studies. New 
York University, School of Commerce, 
Accounts and Finance. 

Additional course, University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Instructor New York University, School 
of Commerce, Accounts and Finance; Secre- 
tary to Dean of New York University, School 
of Commerce, Accounts, and Finance ; Assist- 
ant Professor, Simmons, from 1905. 

Profession, Certified Public Accountant of 
Massachusetts. 

Fellow, Incorporated Public Accountants 
of Massachusetts; Fellow, American Asso- 
ciation of Public Accountants. 



14 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



CHARLES MARSHALL UNDERWOOD, 
Jr., A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
of Romance Languages. Harvard, 'oo ; 
A.M., Harvard, '01 ; Ph.D., Harvard, '05. 

Additional courses, University of Paris, 
University of Grenoble. 

Instructor, Harvard University, Dartmouth 
College, University of Cincinnati ; Instructor, 
Simmons, 1907; Assistant Professor, Sim- 
mons, from 1908. 




ARTHUR IRVING ANDREWS, A.B., Ph. 
D., Assistant Professor of History. Brown 
University, 'oi ; Ph.D., Harvard, '05. 

Assistant in History, Harvard University ; 
Instructor in History, Simmons, 1906; Assist- 
ant Professor from 1909. 

Delta Upsilon, American Historical Asso- 
ciation, American Political Science Associa- 
tion, Institute de Carthage. 



EREDERIC AUSTIN OGG, A.M., Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor of History. DePauw 
University ; A.M., University of Indiana, 
00; A.M., Harvard University, '04; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, '08. 

Instructor in History, University of Indi- 
ana ; Assistant in History, Harvard Univer- 
sity ; Instructor in History, Simmons, 1905 ; 
Assistant Professor from 1909. 

Author of The Opening of the Mississippi, 
1904; Editor of Fordham's Personal Narra- 
tive of Travels in the West, 1906; A Source 
Book of Mediaeval History, 1908. 

Beta Theta Pi, Phi Beta Kappa, Boston 
City Club, Authors' Club (London), Ameri- 
can Historical Association, American Eco- 
nomic Association. 





15 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 




JAMES HOLLY HANFORD, A.B., Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor in English. University 
of Rochester, '04; Ph.D., Harvard, '09. 

Instructor in High School, Rochester, N. 
Y. ; Assistant in English, Harvard ; Assistant 
Professor, Simmons, from 1909. 

Psi Upsilon. 







HESTER CUNNINGHAM, A.B., Secretary. 
Radcliffe College, '99. 

Private Secretary ; Teacher in Private 
School ; Secretary of the Faculty and In- 
structor in English, Simmons, from 1906. 



16 



3totructor0 



S. MARIA ELLIOTT, Instructor in Household Economics. 

Courses at Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Harvard 
Summer Schools, Teachers' School of Science. 

Instructor in public schools of Providence and Boston, in summer 
schools, in School of Housekeeping; Instructor, Simmons, from 1902. 

Author of Household Bacteriology, Household Hygiene, Chemistry 
of Cooking and Cleaning (with Mrs. Ellen H. Richards) ; pamphlets 
and articles in various magazines on Household Economics. 

American Home Economics Association, New England Home 
Economics Association, Teachers' School of Science, Health Education 
Leaerie, M. I. T. Women's Association. 



*to l 



SAMUEL CATE PRESCOTT, S.B., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, '94. 

Associate Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology ; Di- 
rector, Boston Bio-Chemical Laboratory ; Instructor, Simmons. 

Enzymes and Their Application ; Elements of Water Bacteriology. 

Technology Club, Society of American Bacteriologists, American 
Chemical Society, Associate Editor, Centralblatt fur Bakteriology. 

ALICE FRANCES BLOOD, S.B., Instructor in Chemistry. Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, '03. 

Additional courses at Yale University. 

Assistant at Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Instructor, 
Simmons, 1904-1908. 

American Chemical Society, Association of Collegiate Alumnae, 
American Association of Home Economics. 

ALICE NORTON DIKE, B.L., Instructor in Household Economics. 
Smith, '96. 

Additional courses, Harvard Summer School, M. I. T., School 
of Housekeeping. 

Instructor, Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. ; Instructor, School 
of Housekeeping; Instructor, Simmons, from 1902. 

17 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

MARGARETA ELWINA MITZLAFF, Instructor in German. 
Teachers' College in Germany. 
Additional course, Radcliffe College. 
Instructor, Wellesley ; Instructor, Simmons. 

CAROLINE JEWELL COOK, A.B., LL.B., Instructor in Commer- 
cial Law. 

EVA LOUISE MARGUERITE MOTTET (Brevet Superieur), 

Instructor in French. College of Montbeliard, France. 

Additional course, Romance Philology. 

Instructor, Wellesley ; Instructor, Simmons, from 1903. 

ZILPHA DREW SMITH, Instructor in Philanthropic Work. Bos- 
ton Normal School. 
General Secretary Associated Charities of Boston ; Instructor, 

Simmons, from 1904. 

Occasional papers in proceedings of National Conference of 

Charities. "A study of deserted wives and deserting husbands." 

Monday Evening Club, Conference Case Committee of Day 

Nurseries. 

FRANCES SEDGWICK WIGGIN, B.L., Instructor in Library 
Science. University of Wisconsin. 
Additional courses at Pratt Institute Library School. 
Librarian of Colorado College ; Instructor, Simmons, from 1904. 

EDITH ARTHUR BECKLER, S.B., Instructor in Biology. Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, '02. 
Instructor, Simmons, from 1904. 

JUNE RICHARDSON DONNELLY, S.B., B.L.S., Instructor in 
Library Science. University of Cincinnati, '95 ; N. Y. State Li- 
brary School, '07. 

Cataloguer, Cincinnati Public Library; Instructor, Simmons, 1905- 
1910; Director Library School, Drexel Institute, from 1910. 

Phi Beta Kappa, American Library Association, Perm. Library 
Club, Keystone State Library Association, Executive Committee Key- 
stone State Library Association, N. Y. State Library School Asso- 
ciation. 

18 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

MYRA COFFIN HOLBROOK, A.B., A.M., Instructor in English. 
Vassar, '94; A.M., Wesleyan University, '99. 
Instructor, Simmons, from 1905. 

ALICE MAY KIRKPATRICK, A.B, Instructor in Chemistry. 
Wellesley, '99. 

Additional courses, University of Missouri, Harvard Summer 
School. 

Instructor in private schools ; Christian College, Columbia, Mo. ; 
Instructor, Simmons, from 1903. 

College Club, Association Collegiate Alumnae, Boston Wellesley 
Club. 

HELEN JACKSON, A.B., S.B., Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 
Mt. Holyoke, '00; S.B., Simmons, '07. 

Additional course in University of Pennsylvania. 
Instructor, Simmons, from 1904. 

JANE BOIT PATTEN, S.B., Instructor in Biology. Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, '06. 

Additional courses at Hochschule, Dresden, Germany ; Marine 
Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole. 
Instructor, Simmons, from 1906. 

ELIZABETH ALLISON STARK, A.B., S.B., Instructor in Secre- 
tarial Studies. Wellesley, '95 ; S.B., Simmons, '07. 
Assistant Registrar, Wellesley College ; Instructor, Simmons, 

from 1906. 



GERTRUDE WILLISTON CRAIG, Instructor in Typewriting. 

Pratt Institute. 

Secretary to President National Biscuit Co.; Secretary to Adver- 
tising Manager, Review of Reviews ; Instructor, Simmons, from 1907. 

HARRY WORTHINGTON HASTINGS, A.B., A.M., Instructor in 

English. Brown, 04; A.M., Harvard, '06. 

Instructor, Williamsport High School ; Assistant, Brown Univer- 
sity ; Instructor, Simmons, from 1907. 

Chi Phi. 

19 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

ARTHUR STONE DEWING, A.B., A.M.. Ph.D., Instructor in Psy- 
chology and Ethics. Harvard, '02 ; A.M., Harvard, '03 ; Ph.D., 
Harvard, '05. 

Assistant in Philosophy, Harvard College ; Instructor, Simmons, 
from 1907. 

Papers in Journal of Philosophy; Introduction to History of 
Modem Philosophy; Laboratory note-books in Chemistry, Botany, Zo- 
ology, Physiology ; Life as Reality. 

LAURA FISHER, Instructor in the Psychology of Child Life. St. 
Louis Kindergarten Training School. 

Additional courses, Massachusetts Institute of Technology ; Co- 
lumbia University. 

Supervisor St. Louis Kindergartens; Principal, Training School 
for Kindergartners, Boston ; Director of Public Kindergartens, Boston, 
Mass. ; Instructor, Simmons, from 1907. 

Essays on kindergarten in various magazines; The Kindergarten 
in America; The Kindergarten and the Primary Schools. 

Women's Educational Association, Eastern Kindergarten Asso- 
ciation. 

ISADORE GILBERT MUDGE, Ph.B., B.L.S., Instructor in Library 

Science. Cornell University, '97; B.L.S., N. Y. State Library 

School, '00. 

Reference Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Economy, 
University of Illinois; Librarian, Bryn Mawr College; Instructor, 
Simmons, from 1910. 

A Thackeray Dictionary, joint author with M. E. Sears. 

Kappa Alpha Theta, Phi Beta Kappa, American Library Asso- 
ciation, American Bibliographical Society, N. Y. Library Club. 

AMY M. SACKER, Instructor in Decoration and Design. 

CLARA DELLA CAMPBELL, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Instructor in 
Romance Languages. Allegheny College. 

Instructor, Simmons, from 1908. 
Kappa Alpha Theta, Phi Beta Kappa. 

20 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

EDGAR GROVE EVANS, S.B., Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Colgate University, '05 ; Ph.D., University of Gottingen, '08. 

Instructor, Simmons, from 1908. 
Papers in the "Annalen der Chemie." 

Phi Kappa Psi, Theta Nil Epsilon, Phi Beta Kappa, Beta Delta 
Beta. 

GRACE FLETCHER, Instructor in Sewing. Pratt Institute. 

Instructor in public schools, Allegheny, Penn., and in Y. W. C. A. 
evening school, Pittsburgh. 

Instructor, Simmons, from 1908. 

SARAH ELIZABETH JUDSON, A.B., Instructor in Chemistry 

Vassar College, '03. 

Additional courses in Boston University, Barnard College, 
Simmons College. 

Chemist in physician's laboratory, N.Y. 

Instructor, Simmons, from 1908. 

BERTHA MARION PILLSBURY, A.B., A.M., Instructor in 
English. University of Illinois, '95 ; A.M., Radcliff e, '98. 
Instructor at University of Illinois, at Bryn ilawr; Instructor. 

Simmons, from 1908. 
Phi Beta Kappa. 

HESTER RIDLON, S.B., Instructor in Household Economics. 
University of Chicago; S.B., Columbia University. 

Instructor, Simmons, from 1908. 

Articles in American Home Economics Journal. 

Alpha Epsilon Iota, Delta Epsilon, Woman's University Club, 
N.Y. City. American Home Economics Association, New England 
Home Economics Association. 

ELLA JOSEPHINE SPOONER, Instructor in Sewing. Framing- 
ham Normal School, '96. 

Additional courses at Harvard Summer School, Simmons College, 
Columbia University Summer School. 

Instructor at Perkins Institute, Boston Trade School for Girls ; 
Instructor, Simmons, from 1907. 

21 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

JENNIE HINMAN WELD, Instructor in Institutional Management. 

FRANCES GERTRUDE WICK, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Instructor in 
Physics. Wilson College, '975A.M., and Ph.D., Cornell University, 
'06 and '08. 

Instructor, Butler High School ; Instructor, Simmons, from 1908. 
Papers in Physical Reviews. 
Sigma Xi. 



MIRIAM BIRDSEYE, A.B., Instructor in Household Economics. 
Smith College. 

Additional courses at Pratt Institute. 

Instructor, Hebrew Technical School for Girls, N. Y. City ; In- 
structor, Simmons, from 1909. 



BESSIE MARION BROWN, S.B., Instructor in Chemistry. Sim- 
mons, '07. 
Instructor, Simmons, from 1907. 

FLORENCE SOPHRONIA DIALL, Instructor in Physical Training. 

Sargent Normal School of Physical Training, '01. 

Additional courses at De Pauw University, Harvard Summer 
School, Woods Hole Biological Laboratory. 

Instructor, Vassar College, Physical Director, Y. W. C. A. Terre 
Haute, Ind. ; Instructor, Simmons, from 1909. 

Kappa Alpha Theta. 

CHARLOTTE PENNIMAN EBBETS, Instructor in Household 
Economics. Pratt Institute. 
Additional courses, University of Pacific. 
Dietitian, New York City ; Instructor, Simmons, from 1909. 

BEULAH CLARK HATCH, S.B., Instructor in Household Econom- 
ics. Simmons, '08. 
Instructor, Simmons, from 1909. 

22 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

JOHN VAN LIEW MORRIS, A.B., Instructor in Physics and Math- 
ematics. Harvard, '09. 

Instructor, Simmons, from 1909. 
MARIE THAYER, Instructor in Millinery. 

ABBY L. SARGENT, Lecturer on Cutter Classification. Salem 

Normal School. 

Librarian, Wilmington, N. C, Middlesex Mechanics' Association, 
Medford Public Library. 

Appalachian Mountain Club, Massachusetts Library Club. 

WILLIAM THOMPSON SEDGWICK, Ph.B., Ph.D., Lecturer on 
Sanitary Science. Yale, 'jj; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, '81. 

Professor of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology ; Bi- 
ologist to Massachusetts Board of Health; Curator Lowell Institute, 
Boston; Trustee, Simmons College; Lecturer, Simmons, from 1902. 

General Biology ; Principles of Sanitary Science and Public Health. 

St. Botolph Club, Warren Farm Golf Club, Board Directors 
Sharon Sanitorium. 

CHARLES KNOWLES BOLTON, A.B., Lecturer on History of 
Libraries. Harvard, '90. 

Assistant, Harvard Library ; Librarian, Brookline ; Librarian, 
Boston Athenaeum ; Lecturer, Simmons, from 1907. 

Saskia, the Wife of Rembrandt ; The Private Soldier under Wash- 
ington ; Editor, Letters of Hugh, Earl Percy, from Boston and New 
York, Scotch Irish Pioneers. 

Massachusetts Historical Society, Colonial Society of Massachu- 
setts, Maine Historical Society, Chairman Visiting Committee of 
Museum of Fine Arts. 

ELIOT THWING PUTNAM, A.B., Lecturer on Architecture. 

STANLEY BRAMPTON PARKER, Lecturer on Architecture. 

BLANCHE LEONARD MORSE, A.B., Assistant in Drazving and 
Design. 



23 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

GERTRUDE LEE ALLISON, S.B., Assistant in the Library. Sim- 
mons, '07. 
Assistant, Simmons, from 1907. 

ETHEL POWYS STURTEVANT, A.B., S.B., Assistant in Secre- 
tarial Studies. Tufts, '07 ; S.B., Simmons, '09. 
Assistant, Simmons, from 1908. 
Alpha Omicron Pi, Tufts College Alumnae Association. 

RUTH BRYANT, S.B., Assisiajit in Biology. Simmons, '09. 
Assistant, Simmons, from 1909. 

AGNES CHRISTINE EARLY, S.B., Assistant in Household Eco- 
nomies. Simmons, '09. 
Assistant, Simmons, from 1909. 

MARGERY HUGHES, Assistant in Sewing. 

Instructor, Lima Kindergarten, Santer Mission School ; Assistant, 
Simmons, from 1909. 

Tau Kappa Pi. 

BERTHA MAY REED, Assistant in Household Economics. 

MARION SHEPHERD, Assistant in Sewing. Stock-bridge Summer 
School, 08 and '09. 
Assistant, Simmons, from 1909. 
Lend-a-Hand Club. 

MARY BOSWORTH STOCKING, Assistant in Household Eco- 
nomics. 

MABEL WILLIAMS, S.B., Assistant in the Library. Simmons, 09. 

JANE COMEY WILLIAMS, Ph.B., S.B., Assistant in Secretarial 
Studies. Boston University, '02 ; S.B., Simmons, '03. 
Instructor in Holliston High School ; Assistant, Simmons, from 

1910. 

24 




Hi0torp 



1870 Death of John Simmons. 

1899 November 2. Incorporation. 

1902 October 9. Opened for instruction with - 

1902 Simmons Hall, 38 St. Botolph Street, opened. 

1904 Main college building' in Fenway opened. 

1904 East, West and Students' Houses opened. 

1905 March 14. Authorized to confer degree of B.S. 
1905 South Hall, Refectory built. 

1907 North Hall built. 

1907 Peterborough House opened. 

1909 West wing of college built. 

1909 Bellevue House opened. 



-students. 



25 



Alumnae Association 



OFFICERS 
Martha Wentworth Suffren, Pres. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Ruth Blan chard Gibson, Vice-Pres. 

Roxbury, Mass. 
Eva Whiting White, Secretary 

Roxbury, Mass. 

Theodora Kimball, Treasurer 

Dorchester, Mass. 



DIRECTORS 
Alice Higgins 

Worcester, Mass. 
Jessie Moore 

Boston, Mass. 
Louise Andrews, 

Brookline, Mass. 
Marion Burrage, Rec. Sec. 

Cambridge, Mass. 



Most persons come to the close of their four years of college life 
with a very genuine feeling of regret. There are those who have 
brought to their work no very serious purpose save that of getting 
their measure of pleasure and profit from the companionship which 
such a life offers, and there are those who, in seeking to drink to the 
full of the opportunities offered, give in return the very best that is in 
them. To both of these the ending is sad, and it is to them that the 
Alumnae would send their welcome. 

Our interest in our college must not die, because we have turned 
in one day from students into graduates, but rather it should increase, 
because it is then more within our power to be of use to our Alma 
Mater. Many of our number are going out to posts of responsibility ; 
they will be then be able to gauge more accurately the true worth of the 
work they have just completed, and in retrospect commend what they 
could not value as they passed along. As graduates our responsibility 
is even greater than as students, for in the years to come the reputation 
of the college will depend largely upon our accomplishment, and by it 
will public opinion be swayed. 

And so the object of the Alumnae Association is twofold. It must 
carry on the feeling of comradeship created and become a part of us 
during our college life, and it must serve as a means whereby our 
interest and loyalty and responsibility to the college may not be a mere 
desire in our own minds, but an actual working force. 

To the class of 1910, which is this year to be added to our ranks, 
we extend a most cordial welcome. 

Martha Wentworth Suffren 



26 



CIa0S of 




1910 





©fftcers 




MARJORIE C. ELMES 




President 


JNIE C. PERRY 


ELIZABETH H. EMERSON 


Vice-President 


Secretary 




MARY I. HASKELL 




Treasurer 



Recollections of a Senior 




O you remember the first day you came to Simmons? My, 
wasn't it hot? You asked the motorman in a very timid, 
quavering voice to "stop at Simmons College, please," and 
he did, and you got off with some other girls and looked around, but 
you didn't see it anywhere. Nevertheless, you followed them, and 
when you came to a big gray building with dogs looking out of little 
cubby-holes 'round the top, you wondered if it was going to be the 
place. However, as nobody else paid any attention, but walked right 
by, you stopped paying attention and tried to act as if you really knew 
it wasn't, all the time. In a minute or two you came to what you knew 
must be Simmons, and you boldly followed the others up the steps 
and in the door. Of course, if the principal of the high school where 
you went hadn't perjured himself by certifying that you had a "knowl- 
edge of arithmetic sufficient for the application of the fundamental 
principles," you would have come in several days before and been 
quite familiar with your surroundings, or if you had been "a dormitory 
girl" you would have been impressively ushered over by patronizing 
upperclassmen. Neither of these estates fell to your lot, however, 
and you stood just inside the door by yourself, very lonesome and very 
scared. Suddenly a person with a badge dashed forward from a group 
and laid hands upon you. "Wanna register — Household Ec, Libr'y, 
Secretarial, Science? C mon." "Er — Secretarial," you faltered and 
blindly you followed her impetuous lead, trusting implicitly in her 
seeming unbounded knowledge of "everything." She led the way 
into a very hot room which was full of people writing or walking about. 
Seizing three sheets of printed paper, she thrust them into your hands. 
"There," she sighed in the tone of "one more over," "write down 
what it says there, 'n' have the division all right, and fix your hour 
plan to match it, and take it and have them certify it," and she van- 
ished. You groaned inwardly and cast a longing, beseeching 
glance toward the door through which her official person had 
disappeared, but evidently she had gone irrevocably. You learned 
afterwards that you had been "welcomed" and that was all any 
ordinary Freshman had any right to expect. You heaved a heart- 
felt sigh and sat down to write, though you had not the slightest 
idea what. Feverishly catching up a pen you sought to unravel the 

30 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

intricacies of those pages and do as you were told, but you simply 
became more and more confused and began idly to trace the edges of 
the sunbeams that fell warmly across the desk. Whew, but it was 
hot ! The room grew more crowded and it seemed stifling. What 
zvas German la, and if you took History I- VI, they came together, 
and, Oh dear, why didn't someone come and explain ? And then you 
gathered yourself together and went and asked someone at a desk, 
who did explain, and you sat confidently clown and did it all wrong. 
And then it was twelve o'clock and they told you that registration was 
over for that day and that you were to come in tomorrow. And when 
you got home, hot, tired, hungry, they asked you if you liked it and 
you said "Ye-e-es" and wondered inwardly if it was all going to be as 
hard as that. 

We will draw a veil over the ensuing few days with the hundreds 
of disasters attendant upon "getting a locker," procuring a fountain 
pen which upheld its name by action at all times. When you got home, 
you told "them" you had climbed millions of flights of stairs and you 
hoped you would sprain your ankle so you could ride in the elevator, 
and "they" said "You needn't complain, you know how you teased to 
go there," so then you kept still. 

Will you ever forget that first recitation, when the instructor 
called your name and you blushingly rose to recite? The girls on each 
side of you jerked you down abruptly and whispered disdainfully that 
"you don't stand up to recite in college" ; and then you got redder and 
redder in a perfect agony of embarrassment, while everybody laughed. 
But then the next day, in another class, someone else did the same 
thing, so you didn't care and laughed very hard with all the others. 

You used to run everywhere those first few weeks. You ran for 
cars and for trains and you always got to college before quarter of 
nine at the latest. You were very conscientious. Do you remember 
that time in English I, when they told you to go down to the "B. P. L." 
and read "Greene's Short History of England"? Of course you 
never thought of not going! You hurried importantly in and fell down 
flat about half way up those white marble stairs because they were 
so kind of dazzly you couldn't see where one ended and the next began. 
Someone handed you your umbrella and someone else picked up your 
lunch box which had rolled down the whole length and left a trail 
of crumbs behind it, and after that, you slowed up. After dutifully 
"browsing" around Bates Hall as recommended by all departments 
until three men had come up and asked you what you wanted and did 

3i 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

you know it was for reading" only and why didn't you sit down, you 
finally did sit down at number 29 and awaited the coming of Greene's 
Short History which you had ordered. After a long, long, long time 
a spindle-legged anaemic-looking little boy reeled in, staggering under 
the weight of an armful of gigantic volumes ; behind him came a 
smaller boy pushing a dray effect also heavily laden. They approached 
your table and began to unload ; they piled them up around you in 
tiers and you watched them idly wondering who could be going to 
attack that formidable looking fortress ; surely not that draggled old 
man at the other end, bent over a cobwebby little manuscript. Finally 
your curiosity got the better of you and you leaned over and glanced at 
the title of one. You saw "Greene's" ; a sickening feeling crept over 
you and you rapidly surveyed them all. So this was Greene's Short 
History of England ! As the gasping boy with a heartfelt sigh dis- 
emburdened himself of the last volume you rose determinedly, drew 
on your woolen gloves with a decided jerk, and stalked out. And 
thereafter, vou were a changed being; you had found that after all, 
even at college, one did not do all that was asked of one. As you 
look back now, you see that it was really quite a crisis in your career. 
There have always been a few gullible, unsuspecting souls who would 
let you take their reading" slips "just a jiff so" you could "remember 
what we had," and strange to say, the eagle-eyed recipients have never, 
not even in Economics I, seemed to perceive the startling uniformity. 
Funny, isn't it, how it will take fifty-six girls each just thirty-one 
minutes to read nine pages in Coman's Industrial History of the 
United States? 

For a while after the Greene's History episode, things went along 
quite smoothly. You complained a good deal,, it is true, but that was 
just on general principles to give an impression of martyrdom at home, 
which had certain desirable, practical results, i. e., immunity from doing 
the dishes on Thursday nights, permission to go to walk Sunday 
morning's instead of attending church, and the like. Incidentally you 
did more work than you have ever done since ; novelty lured you on 
to endeavor till of a sudden you pulled up with a telling jerk. Do 
you remember Hygiene I and the Nervous Mechanism? You used 
to go into that course and stay for centuries it seemed ; you looked to 
see if your hair hadn't turned gray when you emerged from an 
interminable session. Well, one day you had to draw a "diagram of 
the mechanism of the eye during an involuntary wink" and that was 
not a drawing in which your imagination could aid you materially. 

32 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

1 1 had to be from the "inside looking ont" and not from the "outside 
looking in." 

The following Friday when you ran down the hall to ransack 
the compartment drawer to see what everyone got, you found a sad 
surprise awaiting you. When you extracted your artistic production 
from a sorry looking pile, you found you had an F and you were 
paralyzed with fear. There was obviously but one tiling to do! You 
went straight to Miss Arnold and asked if you couldn't drop History! 
And of course she said you couldn't, but somehow while you were in 
there you got the impression that she was saying that you could. It is 
funny about these appointments with the Dean ; during the four years 
you haven't noticed that, though you have grown older and, it is to 
be hoped, wiser, there is any appreciable difference in either scene or 
result. You cry a little, you don't know just why, and she smiles a 
great deal, and though you entered determined and defiant, you emerge 
wilted and penitent, and you have never been quite able to decide why. 

Do you remember that time the spring of Junior year just before 
the Dance when you got to cutting so-much, and finally as you came in 
one morning your eyes were greeted by one of those dreaded billet- 
doux? Then when you got in the office your knees were all shivery 
and you sat on the tip edge of the chair. My, weren't your hands 
cold, and yet your head was all hot and throbby. Miss Arnold didn't 
seem a bit nervous, but took up a pile of white papers and said, "March 
27, shorthand, typewriting — why were you unable to be present?" 
And you scrooched down and tried to look through the back of the 
sheet to see whether you had written a long or a short one, but you 
couldn't see anything and you hadn't an idea what you'd written — 
and — well, you were sure you'd never be absent again, ami then He 
asked you to go to the Harvard Brown game that came Wednesday 
afternoon, and you really did need the air, and — Ah, well, the most 
striking thing about that affair was that He remembered your once 
saying, "If anything should happen, just call me up on the telephone 
and they'll leave a note on the board for me," and something did 
happen, so he called up and the Dean's secretary answered, and he said, 
"Will you please tell Miss — not to meet me in Harvard Square at 
three this afternoon ; the game has been postponed." Naturally you 
didn't get the message and there were certain complications when you 
tried to explain why you had cut. 

Then there were those examinations! Remember Freshman Mid- 
years when you could hear the beef-tea cups bump, clatter, rattle, bump 

33 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



on the elevator and then finally land with a crash? After a breathless 
suspense Mary and Joe would come in with trays and pass it around. 
You never took an eye off them till at last you were rewarded — Joe 
dropped one, the tension broke, and everybody laughed. They told you 
afterward that the beef-tea was provided by "a friend of the college." 
You have often wondered since what became of that friend of the 
college — there have been several little suggestions you would fain have 
made to such a one. But whether the results attendant on beef-tea- 
nourished victims were not sufficiently above those ordinarily obtained, 
you do not know, but you have never heard of him since. x\nyhow, 
he always seemed more or less mythical. 

After all, the years have passed quickly. You have thought no 
doubt that you were horribly abused, but Time has interspersed a 
kindly veil through which only the sunshine gleams. They were pretty 
nice years after all, weren't they? 




34 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



HELEN MURRAY ADAMS 

Vergennes, Vermont 

Middlebury High School, Middlebury, Vt. 

Secretarial School 

Honor Com. (2) 




GERTRUDE FRANCES BARBOUR 

Wollaston, Massachusetts 
Quincy High School, Quincy, Mass. 
School of Household Economics 
Bastketball 1910 




VIOLA HAZEL BURNHAM 

Montague, Massachusetts 

Turners Falls High School, Turner's Falls, Mass. 

Secretarial School 




35 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 




CATHERINE M. CASASSA 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Girls High School, Boston, Mass. 

Secretarial School 

Glee Club (2) (3) 

Basketball 1910 




\ 



GRACE MAY CHURCH 

East Pembroke, Massachusetts 
Rockland High School, Rockland, Mass. 
Secretarial School 
Honor Com. (4) 




MARGUERITE BUXTON COBB 

Washington, D. C. 

Central High School, Washington, D. C. 

School of Library Science 

President 1910 (1) 

Vice-President Guild (3) 

Sec. Student Government (3) 

Pres. Student Government (4) 



36 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



MARY RUSSELL CURTIS 

North Tonawanda, New York 

Felton High School, No. Tonawanda, N. 

School of Library Science 

Honor Com. (3) 

Class Day Com. 



Y. 




OLIVE INEZ DUNNICAN 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Dorchester High School, Dorchester, Mass. 

School of Science 

Vice-President Guild (3) 

Senior Dance Com. 

Associate Editor 1910 Microcosm 




FLORA E. DUTTON 

East Craftsbury, Vermont 

St. Johnsbury Academy, St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

School of Household Economics 

Junior Dance Com. 

Honor Com. (3) (4) 

Sec. Guild 1910 

Ways and Means Com. (4) 

Class Day Com. 




37 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 




MARJORIE CARTER ELMES 

Stoughton, Massachusetts 

Miss Brown's Preparatory School, Boston, Mass. 

School of Library Science 

Vice-President 1910 (2) 

Tennis Champion (2) 

President 1910 (3) (4) 




ELIZABETH HOMER EMERSON 

Milton, Massachusetts 

Milton High School, Milton, Mass. 

Secretarial School 

Secretary 1910 (4) 




BERTHA METCALF. EMERSON 

Stoneham, Massachusetts 

Stoneham High School, Stoneham, Mass. 

Secretarial School 

Honor Com. (4) 



38 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



DOROTHY LOIS ENGELHARD 

Evanston, Illinois 

Evanston High School. Evanston, 111. 
Bryn Mawr College (1) (2) 
School cf Household Economics 




HARRIET LOZETTE FARRELL 

Batavia, New York 

Putnam Hall, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

School of Household Economics 




ALINE FRAZER 

Brookline, Massachusetts 

Portsmouth High School, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Secretarial School 




39 



HE MICROCOSM 



1910 




MILDRED VICTORIA FULLER 

East Milton, Massachusetts 
Milton High School, Milton, Mass. 
School of Library Science 
Senior Dance Com. 




ABBIE FRANCES GAMMONS 

Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

Bridgewater High School, Bridgewater, Mass. 

School of Library Science 




BESSIE EMMA GOFF 

Rehoboth, Massachusetts 

English High School, Providence, R. I. 

School of Household Economics 



40 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



EDITH MILLS GORDON 

Milton, Massachusetts 
Milton High School, Milton, Mass. 
School of Household Economics 
Cap and Gown Com. 




RUTH ALMA HARRINGTON 

Brighton, Massachusetts 

Wellesley High School, Wellesley, Mass. 

Secretarial School 

Glee Club (2) (3) (4) 

Junior Dance Com. 

Senior Dance Com. 

Vice-President Guild (3) 




MARY HASKELL 

Bridgton, Maine 

Bridgton High School, Bridgton, Me. 

School of Library Science 

Secretary 1910 (3) 

Treasurer 1910 (4) 

Junior Dance Com. 

Program Com. toio 

Basketball 1910 

Editor-in-Chief 1910 Microcosm 




41 



THE MICROCOSM 



l()IO 




HELEN ESTELLE HORNE 

Milton, Massachusetts 

Milton High School, Milton, Mass. 

Secretarial School 




MARY STANDIN IRISH 

Utica, New York 

Utica Free Academy, Utica, N. Y. 

School of Library Science 




SUSIE HELEN JAMES 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Girls High School, New Orleans, La. 

School of Library Science 

Honor Com. (4) 

Bulletin Com. (4) 

Commencement Com. 

Glee Club (4) 



42 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



GERTRUDE TUCKER JONES 

Wollaston, Massachusetts 
Quincy High School, Quincy, Mass. 
School of Household Economics 
Commencement Com. 




ANNISE BOYD KANE 

Spencer, Massachusetts 

David Prouty High School, Spencer, Mass. 

School of Library Science 

Sec. and Treas. Glee Club (3) 




ALICE GERTRUDE KENDALL 

Andover, Massachusetts 

Punchard High School, Andover, Mass. 

School of Library Science 

Honor Com. (2) 

Basketball 1910 

Commencement Com. 

Associate Editor 1910 Microcosm 

Glee Club (4) 




43 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 




ALICE WINIFRED KENDALL 

Concord, New Hampshire 
Concord High School, Concord, N. H. 
School of Library Science 
Commencement Com. 



\ 




GRACE AGNES KNIGHT 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Dorchester High School, Dorchester, Mass. 

School of Household Economics 

Vice-President 1910 (3) 

Class Day Com. 

Commencement Com 




MAY C. MARTIN 

Weymouth, Massachusetts 

Dorchester High School, Dorchester, Mass. 

School of Household Economics 

Senior Dance Com. 

Glee Club Mgr. (4) 

Alumnae Music Com. 



44 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



DAISY LEONARD MILLER 

West Brattleboro, Vermont 

Brattleboro High School, Brattleboro, Vt. 

School of Library Science 

Glee Club (4) 

Basketball 1910 




BLANCHE D. MILLS 

Brockton, Massachusetts 

Brockton High School, Brockton, Mass. 

Secretarial School 

Basketball 1910 




HELEN LOCKWOOD MYRICK 

Springfield, Massachusetts 

Miss Low's Preparatory School, Stamford, Ct. 

School of Household Economics 

Junior Dance Com. 




45 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 




ELIZABETH KATHERINE NAGLE 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Gloucester High School, Gloucester, Mass. 

Secretarial School 







RUTH PALMER 

South Framingham, Massachusetts 
dishing Academy, Ashburnham, Mass. 
Secretarial School 
Treasurer 1910 (2) (3) 
Treasurer Guild 1910 
Ways and Means Com. (4) 
Glee dub (3) (4) 
Class Day Com. 




ANNIE CHISHOLM PERRY 

Brookline, Massachusetts 

Brookline High School, Brookline, Mass. 

Vice-President 1910 (4) 

Basketball 1910 

Associate Editor 1910 Microcosm 



46 



[HE MICROCOSM 



1910 



BESSIE MARION PINKHAM 

Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Bradford Academy, Bradford, Mass. 

School of Household Economics 




LAURA EVELYN RAMSEY 

Gloucester, Massachusetts 

Gloucester High School, Gloucester, Mass. 

Secretarial School 

Honor Com. (3) 




LOUISE JOHN RANDALL 

Wollaston, Massachusetts 

Cohasset High School 1905, Cohasset, Mass. 

Dedham High School 1906, Dedham, Mass. 

Secretarial School 

Junior Bance Com. 

Glee Club (1) (2) (3) (4) 

Basketball 1910 

College News Correspondent 1909-10 

Business Mgr. 1910 Microcosm 




47 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 




MARY GERTRUDE ROCK 

Marlborough, Massachusetts 

Marlborough High School, Marlborough, Mass. 

School of Household Economics 

Vice-President 1910 (1) 

President lyio (2) 

Commencement Com. 

President Guild 1910 

Associate Editor 1910 Microcosm 




\ 



META RUSTE 

Charles City, Iowa 

Milwaukee-Donner College (1) (2) Milwaukee, Wis. 

School of Household Economics 




ELLA CLAIRE RITCHIE 

Philmont, New York 

Centenary Collegiate Institute, Hackettstown, N. Y. 

School of Library Science 



48 



rHE MICROCOSM 



1910 



ALICE JOSEPHINE DENNETT SANBORN 

Hampton Falls, New Hampshire 
Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. 
Secretarial School 
Senior Dance Com. 




OLGA FLORENCE SCHROEDER 

North Tonawanda, New York 
Felton High School, No. Tonawanda, N. Y. 
School of Household Economics 
Basketball 1910 




RUTH SHATTUCK 

Swampscott, Mass. 

Swampscott High School, Swampscott, Mass. 

School of Library Science 




49 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 




JUDITH WINSOR SMITH 

Roslindale, Massachusetts 

West Roxbury High School, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Secretarial School 

Commencement Com. 

Glee Club (4) 




\ 



DOROTHY ETHEL WAKEFIELD 

Andover, Massachusetts 

Pun-chard High School, Andover, Mass. 

Secretarial School 

Senior Dance Com. 

Associate Editor 1910 Microcosm 




MILDRED HAYNES WALKER 

Maynard, Massachusetts 

Maynard High School, Maynard, Mass. 

School of Household Economics 



50 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



LILA A. PATTEN 

Sullivan, Maine 

Sullivan High School, Sullivan, Me. 

School of Library Science 




ALICE BLANCHE WEBSTER 

Augusta, Maine 

Cony High School, Augusta, Me. 
School of Household Economics 
Basketball 1910 




THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



ELSIE WELLS 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Oliver Ames High School, North Easton, Mass. 

School of Library Science 




FRANCES MARIA WHITCOMB 

Holbrook, Massachusetts 
Thayer Academy, Braintree, Mass. 
School of Household Economics 
Vice-President Guild (3) 
Cap and Gown Com. 




ANNABEL MARY YOUNG 

Greensboro, Vermont 

Craftsbury Academy, Craftsbury, Vt. 

School of Household Economics 




5i 




CHEMICAL LABORATORY 




PHYSICAL LABORATORY 





LA 



n 



LA 







Cla00 of 




X9W 



Officers 



MARGARET ARMSBY 
President 



/ 
MARGARET WITHEY 

Vice-President 



MARGARET S. DAVIS 
Secretary 



CHARLOTTE G. NOYES 
Treasurer 



19X1— %t>t W\)y anti tije Wtyvtion 



LOST my way in the forest and wandered lonely until the 
late moon rising over the trees showed me a narrow path, 
seemingly but little used. It made its way over hillocks, 
around fern-covered boulders ; then suddenly descending, led me down- 
ward over giant roots and creepers until at last I felt beneath my feet 
the treacherous ooze and pull of marshy land. It was very dark there 
in the woods. The air was damp, hot, and filled with the heavy, pene- 
trating odor of swamp flowers and decaying vegetation. The tree 
trunks were covered with slime which clung to my hands. I took one 
step forward, another, a third, and then sprang back with a little 
cry ; for before me there stretched a great expanse of water, black, 
inky black in the moonlight, and I stood on the very edge. Had I taken 
another step — it was well I had gone slowly. I turned to retrace my 
steps. Ah ! Too late, too late ! I cried out in alarm. A cloud of mist 
and fire rose from the water, shutting me in on all sides. 'Flames 
curled about me. Strange odors filled the air. "Help! Help!" I 
shrieked. There was no answer, not a sound — only this awful stillness, 
and through it all the rush and swirl of hurrying hosts whose forms I 
could not see. Out of the smoke and the darkness came hands which 
grasped me, sinewy arms enfolding me ; hot, panting breath across my 
neck, and then I fainted. 

"But," said I, "I don't understand why you brought me here. That 
was an awful fright you gave me. I'll never get over it, and I don't 
see what you gained by it anyway. Tell me — why — •" I stopped and 
looked at her beseechingly. She was seated in her usual place beneath 
the magic oak tree, her instruments on the moss beside her and her 
eyes intent on the crystal globe which hung suspended over the fire. 
It must have been cut from the heart of some gigantic diamond, and 
was all of black, with jagged points and spurs which caught the light 
so that I never tired of gazing at it from a distance, for I dared not 
come too near. All day long the woman of the woods sat watching, 
watching the secrets of that strange globe; now moaning as if in bitter 
pain, now reckoning with various instruments, then breathless, intent, 
on something I could not see, and sometimes, very rarely, smiling as 
though well pleased. 

56 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

She was gazing into it now as if she had not heard my question; 
but even as I was about to ask again,, she turned and, pushing back her 
long, dark hair, beckoned me to her side. "Child," she began, "my 
Child, it has been hard waiting, I know. I must send you back into 
the world again. You must go by the way you came, through fire and 
smoke and darkness, but you will not fear it now. You must carry 
word to the others who are toiling, who are weary because they do not 
know." 

I sank down upon the moss beside her. She laid her hand upon 
my head and I felt strangely happy at her touch. There was a long 
silence, and then, "I must tell you a story," she whispered. "It is many, 
many years since I found the magic diamond, the great black diamond 
with the glowing heart. Dreary years — sad years — filled with misery 
and pain. I learned the sorrow of the world and I could not find the 
remedy." 

"But what does it show?" I asked wonderingly. "What is the 
secret of the sphere?" 

Low and clear came the answer. "In its black depths are shown 
the stories of mankind — the wicked laws — the awful crimes. More 
bitter than the hearts of all my fiends are the lives of many men ! Oh, 
horrid world !" She sprang out into the clearing, flinging her arms 
aloft in wild entreaty. "How long," she cried, "before the earth is 
cleansed of its awful load of sin and crime? How long before my 
daughters set it free? How long, how long?" She paused. The rocks 
around took up the cry and echoed, "long — long — long — " There 
was no other answer. 

It was some time before she took the story up again, but when 
she at last spoke it was in a serene and almost cheerful tone. "You 
must know, Child," she began, "that the world in which you live is a 
world for men, with man-made laws and institutions. They have 
striven hard to bring about reforms, to make all things pure and true, 
but they have lacked the one essential thing, the guiding power of a 
woman's hand. Without that, all things must fail. Clear shining in 
my crystal sphere, I saw their struggles ; and I pitied them, but it was 
years before I formed my plan to help. At last one night, my spirits 
brought me word of a new enterprise, a daring scheme, which planned 
to give a training in those arts and sciences whch would help women 
earn a living wage ; a college, that is, which was to combine the beau- 
tiful with the practical ; intellectual activities with business sense. Why, 
Child, Child, when that news came, my whole great work stood out 

57 




THE MICROCOSM 1910 



clearly before me. I would regenerate the world, and Simmons College 
should prove the instrument. You ask me why I brought you to my 
home. Can you not understand? I wished to tell my plan, to send 
back word. My message you shall carry, for you are one of those 
whom I have chosen for the work. One thousand were they all at 
first, one thousand of the finest children on earth — all girls. I found 
them here, I found them there, I travelled through the countries of 
the world, and everywhere there grew a child, beautiful, strong, and 
wise, I chose her for my own. One thousand children were they all, 
but soon the number lessened. Many died — they were not strong 
enough to bear the load. Then others proved unfit. I watched them 
carefully, I trained them well, and when I found the slightest flaw in 
mind or heart I put that child aside. When at last their course of 
preparation was complete, when I had guided them through childhood, 
and led them upwards through the years until they stood upon the 
threshold of young womanhood, then I spent long days and nights 
watching, studying carefully each one of those remaining in my care. 
Some were less kind of heart than others, some were less wise. Each 
day I separated one or two, until at last on that fair morning, the 19th 
of September, 1907, I gathered all my little band and brought them 
to the doors of Simmons College. A noble sight they made. Six score 
and two, selected from the highest types of girlhood — the finest of 
my thousand finest of the world. And you were one of them, my 
Child, you know the truth of what I say. The memory of that College 
Opening day will long be with you. Great thoughts filled your heart, 
lofty ambition, noble sentiments were written on your brow. And so 
with all the rest. It was the fairest class that ever entered through 
those doors, nor has it changed except to grow in charm. For one 
long year they struggled with new tasks. I would not have their path 
made easy, rather did I plan to give them sorrows and adversity. It 
is by this that character is formed. At night I haunted the Instructors' 
homes. I whispered in their ears new schemes. I made them try 
experiments upon you. I told them that you needed extra work. They 
listened and obeyed. What happened then? One-fifth of all my 
chosen maids succumbed beneath the load. One-fifth departed for 
their various homes, or gave up thought of earning a degree. Four- 
fifths remained. The following year they entered once again; took 
up the fight with even greater foes. What History had been in Fresh- 
man year, Physics or Chemistry became — but worse, far worse, and 
with it other tasks which filled each day with horror and each night 

58 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

with dread. And through it all, I sat beside the sphere and saw therein 
the progress of my own, my chosen class. I also saw the weary- 
hearted world awaiting in hope the help so soon to come. 

This year was marked with one bright spot through all the clouds 
of gloom. That was the Sophomore Luncheon. You, my Child, with 
a mistaken sense of duty, stayed at home and studied French ; but 
nearly all the rest gathered together and speedily devoured chicken 
and cakes. That made them happy. As they ate, they talked. Their 
laughter rang out loudly, peal on peal of silvery notes, until the whole 
wide world was gladdened by their joy. But soon it hushed. The 
Luncheon came upon the sixth of March ; the following weeks were 
dark and strenuous. 'Twas study, study, study, hour by hour, pre- 
paring for the awful, final days. A dreadful time, my Child, a fearful 
time ! I dared not make it easy for my girls — I knew that they must 
struggle for the prize. I knew that some must fail. Final examina- 
tions are the magic rod which separates the silver from the gold. My 
class must be all gold. I sent my demons — clever imps ! — to watch 
the hearts of all the faculty. Each entered there as to his natural home, 
and slyly, here a word and there a touch, he bent the mighty mind to 
work his will. Those questions all. were formed by demons' hands. 
With what result? A glorious result! Three- fourths of all my class 
survived. One-fourth were lost. I wept, but let them go." 

There was a long, long silence. The dying fire glowed faintly 
in the center of the clearing. The moon had set, the stars were growing 
dim. But the crystal sphere hung like a ball of flame, clear flashes 
darting from its coal-black heart. Trembling, afraid, I crept up closer 
to her knee and whispered, "But what will happen now? How many 
of our Class will still remain? This is our Junior year. Shall we 
survive? Can we outlast the awful toil to come? And after that — 
what then ?" 

Her face grew radiant, and in her eyes there glowed the light of 
high resolve. "Only the highest, the bravest, the wisest, only the purest 
gold of all my band will win the prize. They will struggle — persevere — 
succeed. There is happiness before them. They will be famous for 
their beauty, wit, and grace ; and I shall send a comet to watch over 
them, to shine upon them as a sign of their superior excellence. They 
will make glad the hearts of Dean and President; they will rejoice the 
souls of their Instructors. The Corporation shall come to look upon 
them as on something rare and very precious. They will be graduated 
with high honors and then — then shall come the mighty triumph of 

59 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



my life. I have chosen them, I have trained them, I shall have sent 
them forth into the world. There shall they overcome all wickedness. 
They shall reign at the head of one vast movement of reform. Their 
names shall be shouted from the house-tops ; they shall be heralded 
as those who come to regenerate the world. Thousands will flock to 
their standards, and we shall see the newly awakened force of woman- 
hood sweeping onward, irresistibly ; and in advance, strong, brave, 
indomitable, will march the little group which I have chosen. This is 
your history — this is your future. Return — return to the others who 
are striving and tell them of the destiny awaiting them. Work on — 
toil on — be not discouraged — for the Class of 191 1 cannot fail!" 







60 



Ck00Of 19 1 1 



Ackerman, D. Mildred 
Allen, Abbie L. 
Amery, Elisabeth L. 
Armsby, Margaret 
Atkinson, Leona B. 
Ayres, May 
Barker, Muriel 
Barnes, Ruth W. 
Barrows, Harriet E. 
Beverley, Effle R. 
Blanchard, Jessie 
Burke, Minnie E. 
Caryl, Anne F. 
Chamberlain, Harriet L. 
Cummins, Catherine R. 
Davis, Dora E. 
Davis, Grace G. 
DeCosta, H. Estelle 
DeLima, Edith 
Dunbar, Mary E. 
Dusossoit, Delphine J. 
Eliot, Alice 
Farrall, Harriet L. 
Flagg, Carolyn 
Frizzell, Mildred C. 



Giddings, Ernestine 
Guilder, Ruth P. 
Haskell, Alice G. 
Hawkes, Abigail T. 
Hawley, Marguerite 
Hayford, Ruth 
Hobbs, Elisabeth 
Hopkins, Dorothy 
Hopkins, Hilda 
Howe, Natalie F. 
Hunt, Edith B. 
Johnson, Ethel M. 
Judkins, Marion L. 
Leonard, Fannie G. 
Lyman, Eleanor 
McPherson, Grace E. 
Mason, Maud L. 
Morrison, Ivanetta M. 
Morse, Elsie E. 
Mumford, Gertrude L. 
Noyes, Charlotte G. 
Nunn, Dorothy C. 
Plant, Margaret M. 
Platts, Catharine N. 
Putnam, Elizabeth G. 



Quimby, Ruth E. 
Ramsey, L. Evelyn 
Reese, Cornelia 
Rhodes, Miriam A. 
Richardson, Leonora 
Robertson, Annie 1. 
Sander, Margaret J. 
Sargent, Florence C. 
Scott, Madelaine L. 
Slack, Nellie M. 
Smith, Miriam 
Springfield, Elizabeth L. 
Stebbins, Margaret B. 
Studley, Lucy A. 
Sutcliffe, Marjorie F. 
Towle, Lucy I. 
Trimmer, Florence 
Webster, Alice B. 
Weeks, Eva F. 
Welch, Grace 
Wentworth, Alzira C. 
Wilkinson, Jennie B. 
Williams, Lillian M. 
Withey, Margaret 
Woodward, Helen 



61 



Cla00 of 




X912 



©fftcers 



GLENNA M. TRUE 

President 



HILDA HOUGH 
Vice-President 



HARRIET M. BOSWORTH 
Secretary 



VIOLA J. ANDERSON 
Treasurer 




iBtorp of X912 



N the general category of college classifications the Sopho- 
mores are, I believe, as a rule, slighted, and considered if 
not nonenities, as dull necessities, not amusing like the 
Freshman, not romantic like the Juniors, not grandiose like the 
Seniors. Poor deluded classifiers, they know not what a glorious 
thing it is to be a Sophomore. He is a being above the common herd, 
on a pedestal, as it were, where he has the time and pleasure to observe 
below him the seething mass of his fellows,' — the Freshmen, trembling 
for fear of the sudden termination of their college career ; the Juniors, 
in agony from the third refusal to their prom. ; the Seniors, looking 
madly for a job. Oh, it is almost magical to be a Sophomore. The 
second year is a sort of oasis in the college desert, a fresh air farm 
for the college slums. At least, the Sophomore breathes free and 
easy. Even studies do not bother him much. Oh, people, look upon 
us, Simmons 1912, and see true Sophomores. We are a model and 
an object lesson. 

Not of reflected light, 
Not of refracted light, 
But of ourselves a light ! 
Oh, you young Freshmen, 
Take an example, 
Call your companions, 
Behold Perfection ; 
Then when you enter 
Into your second year, 
You'll ever be thankful 
You followed our gleam. 

In 1908, we, the class of 1912, entered Simmons. That was the 
first event of our history — our entrance — and then nothing happened. 
We fluttered about at the Guild reception knowing no one, but never- 
theless busy in finding faint resemblances between certain upper class 
girls and certain other girls at home. Let us not now in irreverence 
smile as we think of the lumps that arose in our throats at that time. 

The weeks, however, rolled by after a very slow fashion of their 

66 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

own, and our October class elections came. We travelled on rather 
shaky ground in those days because we did not know our classmates 
at all well, but some kind angel must have guided us, for we rose 
in a body and made Elinor Whitney our first president. Caroline 
Aldrich was elected vice-president, Dorothy Stanton, secretary, and 
Hazel Turner, treasurer. We took the colors of the class of 1908 — 
yellow and white — and chose the yellow daisy for our flower. 

Our first class venture was the decoration of the Chapel for the 
Christmas assembly. Margaret Becker was chairman of the committee 
on decoration and was eminently successful. (Here also let it be 
known that she paid the sexton for his services, even though he now 
disclaims all knowledge of the fact). 

The first social function to which we as a class were invited was 
the Baby Party, given by the Seniors. In our shortest frocks and our 
pinkest stockings, with a ridiculous volubility, we undertook to impress 
our hostesses. Whether we acted our parts with too much naturalness 
or not, is still a question, yet it remains that we didn't impress them 
in the least. They were very nice about it, but we knew they weren't 
particularly enthusiastic about us. The Juniors tried to make up for 
any faults of the other classes in regard to us, and always stood ready 
to help us at our need. They pampered us, even to giving us huge 
boxes of Page and Shaw's. Yet what matter if we were often treated 
in a kindly, sisterly, poor-thingly way, our day was yet to come when 
we should show them that we were the equal of any class that had as 
yet entered Simmons. They little dreamed that a class which had such 
i, remarkable propensity for getting lost and appearing green, had 
the making of a — circus. 

COMING. FRESHMAN CIRCUS. MAY 1st. It's Yellow, 
you'll like it. And did we like it! Indeed it meant much more to 
us than merely a good time for an afternoon. It meant the beginning 
of our class spirit, the beginning of our class appreciation, and, in fact, 
the beginning of our class life. 

What is more frolicsome than a circus in May? 

What more thrilling for a ring-master to say 

Than "Down, Venus, down," and see an elephant kneel 

While laughter arises peal after peal? 

What is more harrowing than a grizzly bear walking 

High on a tight rope, and deaf and dumb talking? 

What more wonderful than a human-faced bird 

67 



THE MICROCOSM 19 10 

And side-splitting clowns who with antics absurd 

Play jokes on the people and do such wild feats 

That Mrs. Wiggs' family just jump from their seats, 

With all kinds of animals and monkeys galore 

Who leap-frog in air and hop on the floor? 

What is more deafening than the grand serenade, 

Of "Don't feed the animals." "Pink lemonade." 

"Just hit the nigger and you'll get a cigar!" 

"Keep away from the wild men of Madagascar!" 

"She eats them alive," and "Keep to the right," 

While cops in full uniform hover in sight. 

What but a horse-race in this world is so grand 

While the Merry Widow is played by the band ? 

And what indeed is there that any may sav \ 

\ 

Can exceed the delights of a real circus day? 

After that our social events came in thick and fast. The Sopho- 
mores gave us such a grand time, and such a grand lunch at Marble- 
head. The day, the ocean, everything was perfect. We are sorry 
not to have been able to do the same by you, 1913, but we couldn't get 
a date in the springtime for it. 

Our crowning event, however, had not come off. It arrived with 
May fourteenth and the tennis tournament. We, 1912, won. Ruth 
Symonds was the champion of the day. She brought us to first place 
in the college athletics. Henceforth our prestige was established. 

This year, our second year, is bound to be as glorious. To be sure 
we started in rather awkwardly by holding an unconstitutional election, 
which had to be disregarded and a second one held. Let us hope that 
this argumentative tendency of ours does not lead us to become 
suffragettes. So far, with Glenna True for president, Hilda Hough 
for vice-president, Harriet Bosworth for secretary and Viola Anderson 
for treasurer, the outlook is most satisfactory. As a class we have not 
as yet done very much. The Seniors entertained us royally on 
February ninth. We hope they realized our appreciation of their 
party, for we did our best to win the obstacle, potato, and fat ladies' 
races. In spite of our good times, the day had its sadness, for we 
realized that we could have only a few more such good times together. 
It will be with genuine regret that we lose you this June, Oh, Sister 
Class. 



68 



Cla00 of 1 9X2 



Ida E. Adams 
Fay the M. Akers 
Caroline E. Aldrich 
Helen M. Aldrich 
Elsie R. Allen 
Viola J. Anderson 
Ida D. Antin 
Ellen D. Atwell 
Dorothy M. Atkinson 
Florence K. Babcock 
Elsie L. Basset 
Alice E. Beale 
Margaret E. Becker 
Gladys H. Blanchard 
Harriet M. Bosworth 
Mildred R. Bowen 
Eleanor Bnrnham 
Dorothy G. Burpee 
Alice Charlton 
Sarah M. Chryst 
Jennie P. Clement 
Maria L. Cobb 
Eleanor Cole 
Elsie E. Converse 
Sara F. Cotter 
Helen M. Curtis 
Rachel H. Cutter 
Amy E. B. Day 
Marion J. Dunn 
Dorothy S. Englehard 



Lydia B. Ely 
Kathleen En°iish 

o 

Lucy M. Eveleth 
Hortensia A. Farrall 
Mary S. Fiske 
Carolyn D. Flagg 
Marjorie L. Foster 
Marjorie W. Fox 
Olive French 
Lucy Fritch 
Aldina A. L. Galarneau 
Yida Gegenheimer 
Florence E. Gillette 
Rebecca S. Gross 
Mary P. Halliwell 
Helen R. Harris 
Florence M. Hawkes 
Grace Heatley 
Marie E. Henderson 
D. Margaret Holmes 
Helen K. Horton 
Mary A. Hosley 
Hilda Hough 
Katherine P. Johnson 
Mary A. Jones 
Mabel F. Joslyn 
Margaret C. Lee 
Edna S. Leland 
Viola E. Libby 
Esther M. Lindbloom 
69 



Marion Loring 
Daisy G. Ludden 
Susan A. Lyle 
Daisy I. McCormick 
Marjorie McLean 
Mabel A. Magee 
Miriam Merrick 
Dora W. Moses 
Mabel E. Moston 
Katberine M. Murphy 
Louise B. Nissen 
Helen F. Norton 
Mary L. O'Kane 
Abby H. Parmenter 
Clara L. Penney 
Helen G. Phelps 
Bernice L. Philbrick 
Julia H. Pitman 
Ruth H. Plympton 
Catherine Pratt 
Marion H. Pratt 
Alberta E. Reed 
Elizabeth F. Rock 
Nell Sahler 
Marguerite H. Sayre 
Gladys E. Sharon 
Florence E. Smith 
Helen M. Smith 
Mirian S. Smith 
Helen C. Spaulding 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



Emma G. Stearns 
Alice G. Stephens 
Gertrude M. Sullivan 
Eva F. Swett 
Ruth Symonds 
Mary L. Talbot 
Mildred T. Taylor 



Martha S. Thissell 
Marjorie F. Thomas 
Annie F. Thornton 
Glenna M. True 
Hazel M. Turner 
Helen G. Usher 
Helen F. Watson 



Mary N. Watson 
Elinor Whitney 
Eugenia Wilson 
Mabel H. Williams 
Beulah Wood 
Ellen C. Wood 




70 



CIa00 of 




1913 



Officers 



JEANETTE E. PELLMAN 
President 



DOROTHY W. HUGHITT 

Vice-President 



MARION S. DONALDSON 
Secretary 



MARY E. BAKER 

Treasurer 




Jots of 19X3 



Oct. 27, 1910 
Dear Ruth : 

As a special favor I refrain from the customary "please 
excuse me for not writing sooner" phrase. I'm here and college is fine. 
You just ought to hear the conductors on the Huntington Avenue cars 
yell, "Cy-mins Collige!" They appreciate it, too. 

Now if you won't make rude remarks about my grammatical errors 
I'll begin again and tell you all about it. I've learned a lot in the few 
weeks I've been here (I mean common things, you know, not lessons). 
When the girls said there wasn't any "cut-system" at Simmons, I 
thought that meant you could cut anything you chose, but I soon found 
there was system, all right, in what happened to you afterwards. The 
only chance you get for a legitimate cut here, is when an instructor 
oversleeps or gets hung up in the subway, or gives you one out of the 
kindness of his heart. It is wise, in all cases, I have learned, to keep 
away from his recitation room the whole period, because once, after 
we waited ten minutes and the instructor didn't come, and we skipped, 
something prompted us to return five minutes later and peek through 
the keyhole. He had come, and when he saw our shadows on the door, 
he opened it with a beaming smile and an inviting expression like the 
"Spider and the Fly." Probably anyone but a Freshman would have 
refused to enter, but we were scared. 

I think most of the Freshmen have been in a chronic state of terror 
ever since they came. Those Maclachlan people in the basement began 
it by charging $2.75 for a Physics text-book. They must have what 
is called a nit-conscience, because they'll calmly inform you, just after 
you've given them your last cent, that you "get a rebate at the end of 
the year." Oh, do you think that shows they have conscience? Well, 
I don't ; I think it is only a bribe — to make you think you get some- 
thing for nothing, which I've discovered never happens in Boston. 

We had a sort of test in History the other day, and when we got 
our papers back, I had an L. A great many didn't know what the 
marks stood for, so we asked a Sophomore who was going by. She 
asked what the majority got and when I said "L's and F's," she said, 
"Well, L's for Lovely and F's for Fine. Good work, children!" We 

74 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

hunted for her afterwards with rolls from the lunch-room, but we 
never found her. 

Don't wait so long as I did 'fore you write, will you? 

Dec. 31, 1910. 
Dear Ruth : 

It was Freshman Day at college to-day. We call it that, you 
know, on account of the lunch, whenever they serve that greenish soup, 
cheese salad, and pistachio ice cream. The Freshmen are getting rec- 
ognized everywhere, now. We thought we were quite important when 
they asked us to decorate the Chapel Christmas, but when we had to 
pay $13.50 for the privilege we weren't so keen about it. And no 
one appreciated it, either, except the Children's Hospital, which got 
all the wreaths. Sometimes you feel sad to be a Freshman, and others, 
you're hilariously glad. We're starting out well, though, they all say. 

Last week excuse me, but some one just told me there's a 

Physics test tomorrow. Good-bye and more later. Love to all. 

Feb. 10, 1910. 
My dear Miss: 

May the wrath of Jupiter descend upon thy head ! Blamest 
thou me that I cram — and cram — and cram ? I am hurt and grieved 
that the word "mid-years" produces in your brain not the feeblest 
image of our sensations at this time. However, you are forgiven for 
all abuse. Really, I had to study. We all did. And now they're all 
over, we find that the terrible phrase in the catalogue about students 
"who do not matriculate during the first term" didn't mean a thing. 
They say lots of things like that to scare you, I think. You really have 
to work here, though. But if you did all they expected of you, there 
wouldn't be a thing at Simmons at all except ghosts floating around 
the corridors. 

Because you were so saucy this is all I shall write — until I receive 
an apology. Better send it soon if you want to hear about the good 
times we've had this year. 

Mar. 21, 1910. 
Dear Ruth : 

Yours received. Apology accepted. Want to hear some 
great news? The Freshmen can beat all the other classes at Basket- 
ball ! Why, of course, not all together — you know better. Think of 
it! A class with pink for a class color can do this. Even Halley's 

75 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

comet may surprise us by really doing something now, when such a 
new star as '13 arouses such a commotion. 

All the classes had their pictures taken the other day for the 
'"Microscope," or something like that, which is a sort of college book 
they have every year. When the ugly man took the Freshmen, some 
horrid Sophs got out in front and made faces at us, and the man's hat 
kept blowing off all the time, so we laughed and made him mad. Then 
he took us any old way, without trying to make it nice, and it turned 
out one of the best of all the pictures. That's Freshman Luck. 

Did I tell you about the Card List? It's a new idea of the Dean's 
— the first horrid idea I've known her to have. If you come a minute 
late to class, and they don't believe your excuse at the office, they warn 
you that you'd better be careful. (Of course they're too polite to tell 
you you lie.) Then if you do it again, they catalogue you in a drawer 
under A. I. Item etc., like a flower seed advertisement circular. If 
you really want to see what happens next, you absent yourself unex- 
cused again — -and then your people tell you a few thinks. This part 
is always pleasant, and the next step, too, when you stand on the ragged 
edge, with nothing to step to, really, — just waiting to be pushed off, 
or out. Freshmen aren't afraid to travel the way which "leadeth to 
destruction," though, because they know how to keep off the card-list. 
I know a Freshman who said, "They told me at the office that I was 
on the card-list, and desired my presence, but I didn't go to see them, 
so they wrote again and said they had torn it up" — it meaning the card, 
not the office. 

I've arrived at the conclusion that the Freshies have a great many 
privileges, not granted other students. The elevator man has offered 
to take members of 191 3 (who have paid class dues and signed the 
constitution) to the Library for one cent apiece, every day except Sun- 
day. Oh, we get the benefit of everything. Even at the Glee Club 
concert, hardly anyone brought men except the Freshmen. Some of 
them had three, but they didn't pass them around outside the class — 
Oh, no. It was a private dance for us, with the other classes for 
foliage and mural effects. We enjoyed it immensely. 

Vacation begins Thursday, and this is the first case I've ever 
known of loud rejoicing over "ten days." Ruh ! 



76 



Ck00 of 19X3 



Agate, Helen G. 
Allin, Margaret 
Almy, Helen 
Anderson, Alary W. 
Annis, I. Marjorie 
Avery, Clara E. 
Ayer, Doris L. 
Babcock, Clarissa G. 
Baker, Mary E. 
Bell, Dorothy 
Bierman, Ethel I. 
Boehmke, Helene A. 
Bowen, Mildred R. 
Brown, Edith S. 
Buttrick, Marian 
Carrell, Hope G. 
Cashman, Rita 
Casteels. Lucy 
Caswell, Edna R. 
Chamberlin, Mary E. 
Chapin, Esther S. 
Chapman, Margery C. 
Chryst, Sarah M. 
Clarke, Mazelle L. 
Cole, Mora A. 
Collins, Jeanette M. 
Combe, Hilda A. 
Crouse, Lucile S. 
Curry, Marcella C. 
Curtis, Maud E. 



Day, Elizabeth H. 
Denison, Anne E. 
Diall, Olive E. 
Dilman, Mabel A. 
Donaldson, Marion S. 
Douglas, Wilifred 
Dutton, Mary C. 
Eernald, Marion F. 
Forster, Margaret B. 
Frederick, Katherine M. 
Frost, Helen T. 
Gallagher, Alice R. 
Gibbons, Irene N. 
Glessner, Hazel G. 
Goddard, Marjorie A. 
Goldsmith, Anna F. 
Gurdy, Marie 
Hall, Flora E. 
Hamlin, Helen B. 
Hawes, Ruth 
Hight, Blanche E. 
Hinchliff, Jeannette B. 
Holden, Evelyn 
Holden, Kathryn 
Hubbard, Ruth N. 
Hughitt, Dorothy W. 
Ingalls, Ruth E. 
Irwin, Hazel A. 
Jacobs, Flora M. 
Johnson, Florence P. 
77 



Johnston, Laura E. 
Kaster, Nellie N. 
Keeler, Marion 
Kellaway, Elsie M. 
Kelly, Anna T. 
Kelly, Helen M. 
Lane, Jean P. 
Leonrad, Amy L. 
Locke, Louise 
Macardell, Edith C. 
McDuff, Blanche G. 
Mclntyre, Helen C. 
Martin, Ruth M. 
Maudelstein, Gertrude 
Meggat, Gertrude L. 
Mercer, Irene B. 
Moses, Florence 
Nason, Ruby F. 
Niles, Margaret H. 
Norman, Ruth E. 
Page, Mildred W. 
Parsons, Edith N. 
Pay son, Miriam T. 
Pearson, Mattie E. 
Pellman, Jeanette E. 
Pettengill, Mabel D. 
Pinks, Vera L. 
Platts, Elizabeth F. 
Poole, Blanche 
Porter, Annabel 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



Ready, Helen C. 
Reed, Anna H. 
Ridlon, Margaret 
Rine, Rosina E. P. 
Robbins, Esther M. 
Rose, Ella J. 
St. Clair, Sadie 
Sampson, Annie H. 
Scott, Mary S. 
Shepard, Hannah B. 
Sibley, Helen 
Silver, Margaret D. 
Sim, Mildred E. 



Smith, Helen M. 
Smith, Lois O. 
Spear, Mabel A. 
Starrett, Mildred H. 
Steele, Kathryn N. 
Sterling, Anna M. 
Stevens, Julia F. 
Sullivan, Helen F. 
Sumner, Lydia W. 
Sweet, Olive A. 
Swett, Eva F. 
Symonds, Esther M. 
Thayer, Margaret T. 



Thurston, Elizabeth 
Traver, Ruth M. 
Tyacke, Dorothy 
Walker, Elizabeth M. 
Watson, F. Helen 
Weed, Helen I. 
Wells, Edna A. 
Wells, Katharyn W. 
Wick, Belle 
Wilber, Doris E. 
Williams, Marion S. 
Woodward, Emily E. 
Young, Martha E. 





pniate 



Allen, Esme F. 
Armington, Elisabeth 
Ashenden, Constance 
x\tkinson, Dorothy M. 
Barstow, Helen H. 
Bartholomew, Amanda E. 
Bentley, Margaret L. 
Bicknell, Adaline M. 
Blatchford, Dorothy L. 
Blodgette, Gladys 
Bruner, Ada 
Bulkeley, Grace L. 
Bull, Edith B. 
Burdett, Helen R. 
Burtch, Eva A. 
Cade, Louisa 
Carlton, Maud M. 
Carpenter, Margaret 
Chase, Ethel M. 
Chick, Clara M. 
Clark, Alice W. 
Clark, Evelyn 
Clark, Mildred W. 
Cobb, Maria L. 
Collord, Edith 
Colvin, Marion L. 
Cook, Mary H. 
Cotter, Sara F. 
Crawford, Ruth M. 
Dairy mple, Eva M. 



Davies, Ruth 
Davis, Madeline A. 
Day, Amy E. B. 
Dean, Emma P. 
deBeer, Bessie 
Donaldson, Elena H. 
Driscoll, Susie G. 
Dyer, Orian E. 
Farquhar, May F. 
Fee, Garolyne B. 
Foglesong, Hortense 
Eraser, Hortense C. 
Freeman, Phoebe H. 
Frost, Mabel a.b. 
Gait, Grace 
Gaskell, Babel 
George, Alice C. 
Gill, Mary F. 
Gilliland, Luella G. 
Gleason, Marion G. 
Greene, Lena R. 
Grover, Emma 
Hall, Lucile deN. 
Hamlen, Mary E. 
Harris, Harriett E. 
Hartness, Anna J. 
Hartness, Helen E. 
Hartwell, Marjorie 
Hatch, Frances E., a.b. 
Hayes, Elvah M. 

79 



Hegarty, Mary E. 
Hillman, Blanche H. 
Holbrook, Alice A. 
Holman, Edith C. 
Horsfall, Elizabeth L. 
Hosley, Mary A. 
House, Mary S. 
Hughes, Mabelle L. 
Blunter, Anita D. 
James, Laura G., a.m. 
Jones, Etta 
Raster, Martha L. 
Keeler, Elsie R. 
Kelley, Ruth U. 
Kennedy, Laura K. 
King, Mary H. 
Kingman, Helen P., a.b. 
Kinnie, Alma M., a.b. 
Kneil, Margaret M. 
Lane, Florence M. 
Lee, Margaret C. 
Leonard, Gertrude FI. 
Levy, Florence 
Lewis, Julia S. 
Libbey, Martha J. 
Litchfield, Clara B. 
Little, Julia 
Ludden, Daisy G. 
Luton, Alice L. 
Luton, Lottie C. 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



McBride, Mary 
McClellan, Ethel 
McGrath, M. Elysabeth 
McGurk, Katherine L. 
McKee, Hallie M. 
Macleod, Helen 
Mandelstam, Gertrude 
Mandrill, Lillian 
Mann, Gertrude E., a.b. 
Martin, Ella, s.b. 
Martin, Helen A. 
Masterton, Mildred 
Mathews, Harriet 
Meehan, Lina 
Merrill, Ruth W. 
Morrison, Myrtle D. 
Myrick, Helen L. 
Nellis, Carlotta S. 
Newhall, Bernice E. 
Noyes, Emma I. 
Ober, Alice H. 
Osborne, Lucy A. 
Osborne, Margaret P. 



Ostrander, Bietta 
Palmer, Agnes 
Paradise, Dorothea C. 
Parker, Margaret L. 
Parmele, Margaret H. 
Patten, Lila A. 
Phelps, Ethel L. 
Phelps, Helen G. 
Piper, Ethel R. 
Plant, Amy E. 
Plummer, Elizabeth C. 
Pratt, Marie L. 
Pratt, Marion H. 
Prime, Elizabeth N. 
Ramsey, Esther H. 
Read, Katharine B., a.b. 
Rogers, Frances H. 
Russell, Sarah 
Sahler, Nell 
Sargent, Jennie M. 
Sayre, Marguerite H. 
Schwind, Eugenia 
Shaw, Susan W. 



Sheehan, Alice A. 
Sheldon, Lillian T. 
Sherman, Louise R. 
Sholes, Bertha 
Shryock, Josephine H. 
Smith, Dorothy E., a.b. 
Smith, Phyllis L. 
Spicer, Susan 
Stackpole, Grace 
Standish, Barbara 
Stannard, Emma O. 
Sullivan, Katharine C. 
Swanburg, Nellie B. 
Tarr, Marion L. 
Terrell, Inez J. 
Thurston, Grace R. 
Tracy, Angie E. 
Tufts, Henrietta J. 
Upham, Dorothy T. 
Usher, Helen G. 
Wales, Susan H. 
Wallace, Julia F. 
Wallingford, Miriam C. 



80 




fflgBEa™ 




tubatt <§utfo 



The Guild of Simmons College is a student organization made up 
of the entire student body. It was formed in 1903. choosing for its 
name "Guild" which signifies now, as in olden times, union for strength 
and helpfulness. The scope of the work of the Guild has grown, as 
the college to which its members give allegiance, until now the good 
which it might do and which it will continue to strive to do has in- 
creased manifestly. Fully realizing the difficulties which beset the 
path of an organization with such a simple and yet deeply significant 
purpose, we have chosen a small field in which to work and have left 
for the classes and clubs the more active accomplishments. 

Our Welcoming, Visiting, and Student Aid Committees are, as 
the names indicate, devoted to the earnest work of making college life 
pleasanter and happier. The Program Committee supervises all lec- 
tures, entertainments and social affairs given by the Guild, and arranges 
the dates of all college events, posting notices of such on the Students' 
Calendar. The duties of the Bulletin Committee are to superintend 
the sale of second-hand books at the beginning of the fall term and 
to keep the student bulletin boards in order. 

For five years the Guild has been an active member of the 
Women's Intercollegiate Association for Student Government, and has 
sent delegates annually to the conventions of the association. The 
Guild dues of fifty cents, expected of every student member, meet the 
expenses of the delegates' trips, as also those incurred by the various 
committees during the ye*r 



82 




©fficers of tl)c ^tuUcnt (SatlU 



Florence Trimmer 



Delphine Dussossoit 



Margaret Armsby 



Ruth Palmer 
Treasurer 



Mary G. Rock 
President 



Flora E. Dutton 
Secretary 



Margaret S. Davis 



CJ)e §3>tulient (government Sssoetatton 



The experiment of self-government in the Simmons dormitories 
was first tried in 1905 at Simmons Hall through the efforts of Juliet 
Patterson. In the following year the dormitories on Brookline Avenue 
were opened and the association formally organized in May, 1906. The 
executive authority is vested in a council made up of a president from 
the Senior class, a vice-president, who is president of the Guild, a 
secretary from the Junior class, a treasurer from the Sophomore class. 
The presidents have been Juliet C. Patterson, 1906-7, Theresa C. 
Stuart, 1907-8, and Elizabeth Spalding, 1908-9. In 1908 the organiza- 
tion was enlarged to include the Peterborough dormitories. In addition 
to maintaining order, the association assists in the social life of the 
dormitories and takes charge of the programs of the Sunday vesper 
services. During the present year the old system of study-hours with 
permissions has been abandoned for the quiet hour system. 

Marguerite Buxton Cobb 



84 




Council of tl)e ^tuUent (Sotocrnment Stssociation 

Ruth Palmer Ahbie F. Gammons Helen G. Phelps Margaret S. Davis Harriet Mathews 

Lucy A Studley Mary G. Rock Marguerite B. Cobb Glenna M. True Elsie R. Allen 

Secretary Vice-President President Treasurer 



Weepers 



Under the auspices of the Student Government Association a new 
committee has been created this year to take charge of vesper services 
to be held for the dormitory girls every other Sunday at 6.30 in North 
Hall. The committee includes one girl from each house as follows; 

Cornelia Reese, Chairman 
Mary Rock 
Margaret Withey 
Maria Cobb 
Charlotte Noyes 
Madelaine Scott 

The meetings, which consist of singing and a diort address, have 
been well attended and the venture seems to be a popular and successful 
one. The speakers for the year have been as follows: 



Oct. 


17- 


Dean Arnold 


Get. 


3i- 


Miss Gloster 


Nov. 


14. 


Mr. Charles A. Reese 


Dec. 


5- 


Miss Anne Caryl 


Jan. 


9- 


President Lefavour 


Feb. 


13- 


Miss Cunningham 


Feb. 


27. 


Dean Arnold 


Mar. 


13- 


Miss Noyes 


April 


i/- 


Mrs. Merriman 


May 


1. 


Mr. Coonst 



86 




Cbe Cljair 



Dirzctoi — Frank Lynes 



W$t \9\0 Mitmom 



CMorial BSoajrti 



Editor— in-Chief, Mary Haskell 
Business Manager, Louise J. Randall 



a&soctate Ctutorg 



Alice G. Kendall, 'io 
Mary G. Rock, 'io 
Olive I. Dunnican, 'io 
Caroline E. Aldkick, '12 



Annie C. Perry, 'io 
Dorothy E. Wakefield, 'io 
Ai'.igail T. Hawkes, 'ii 
Elizabeth H. Day, '13 



88 




euttortal ttoarli of tljc itfttcrocoefm, 1910 

Dorothy E. Wakefield Annie C Perry Olive I. Dunnican Caroline E. Aldrick Wary G. Rock Elizabeth H. Day 
Louise J. Randall Mary Haskell Alice G. Kendall 



<&ln Club 



The Simmons College Glee Club is fast becoming a prominent 
factor in the college. From the few enthusiasts who started the Club 
on its upward journey, the number of members has increased during 
the last two years and has reached the encouraging fifty mark. These 
faithful fifty succeeded inarranging and giving before an appreciative 
audience in the college assembly room on March nineteenth, the fol- 
lowing delightful program: 



Greetings 

Who Is Sylvia? 

Absent 

My Shadow 

Over the Water 

Solo : Love Me or Love Me Not 

A Model College Girl 

Berceuse 

Solo : The Danza 

The Policeman 

Jack and Jill 

Barcarolle 

The Sweet Blue Eyes of Springtime 

Grinds 

Alma Mater 



Mendelssohn 

Schubert 

Metcalf 

Hadley 

Hosmer 

Sere lii 

Brown 

Gillespie 

Chadzviek 

Smith 

Nevni 

Offenbach 

Rees 



Dean Arnold 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 




Chairman, Glenna True 

President Lefavour 
Dean Arnold 



Manager 



PATRONS 



Miss Gloster 



May C. Martin 

Miss Pillsbury 
Mrs. Truman 



DANCE COMMITTEE 
Cornelia Reese Elsie Converse 

Grace Davis 

The Glee Club has been practising for the past year with Mr. 
Frank Lynes and under his competent direction has made excellent 
progress. The club wishes to extend its hearty appreciation to Mr. 
Lynes for his work with them ; to Mr. Twining Lynes for his able 
accompaniment ; to Miss Alice A. Reese for her charming solo work ; 
and to Miss Jennie Williamson for her violin accompaniment. 



90 




3 



3 







LIBRARY A 




DORMITORY KITCHEN 





octal 



<Btimt0 






octal Calmbar 190940 



1909 

Sept. 25 Student Government Dance to Freshmen. 

Oct. 2 Guild Reception to Freshmen. 

Oct. 29 Hallowe'en Party. 

Dec. 4 Senior-Freshman Party. 

Dec. 11 Dartmouth Concert. 

Dec. 18 Christmas Party. 

1910 

Jan. 22 Junior-Freshman Party. 

Feb. 12 Senior-Sophomore Party. 

Feb. 22 Washington's Birthday Party. 
March 12 Sophomore-Freshman Party. 
March 19 Glee Club Concert. 

April 15 Junior Dance. 

April 23 Indoor Meet. 

April 30 Sophomore Luncheon. 

April 30 Senior Faculty May Party. 

May 7 Sophomore-Freshman-Senior Picnic. 

May 14 Freshman Frolic. 

May 21 Guild Reception and Tennis Tournament. 

May 27 Student Government Dance. 
June 19-23 Commencement Week. 



95 



3fapane0t Cea 




The Japanese Tea given by the 
Seniors to the Freshmen in the 
refectory the afternoon of Decem- 
er 4, may be cited as a typical 
class party. The hall was decor- 
ated with chrysanthemums and 
Jarane. e screens. The tables, fur- 
nished with copper tea-kettles and 
dainty cups, lacked legs, and tea 
was served by the Senior hostess 
sitting cross-legged on the floor in 
true Japanese style. The guests 
appeared in Japanese costume. A 
program of Japanese songs and 
dances was arranged and executed 
by the Seniors, after which the as- 
sembly indulged in more tea and 
dancing. Credit fcr the success of 
the party is clue to May Martin, the 
chairman of the committee. 



96 




lartmnuttj Qtanr^rt 

GIVEN BY THE DARTMOUTH GLEE CLUB QUARTET, DEC. 1 1, 1909 



Messrs. Peck, Sherwin, Ingersoll, and Meredith 



Williams True to Purple 
a) Go Ask Papa 



Medley, 1908 



Mighty Lak a Rose 
a) Dixie Kid 



Garden of Roses 
a) Women 

97 



Jenk's Compound 

a) Take me up, up, up 



Dartmouth Song 



Junior Bance 

April 15, 1910 




Now it befell on the appointed night, which was a pleasant evening 
and warm withal, that there came unto South Hall a goodly number 
of young men. And the porters who stood by the door opened unto 
them and each spoke a name as he passed by her. Then the fair messen- 
gers sped away and returned with the maidens who found everyone 
her own knight. There arose anon the sound of music, and dancing 
made the night merry. Full many an undergrad pressed her face 
against the window pane, eke the Senior sighed that that bright time 
should return to her no more. So the night passed with feasting and 
pleasure sans alloy. And at the stroke of twelve, the dance ceased and 
there were partings in sorrow. But with the morn came much weari- 
ness of the flesh and with half a smile and half a tear the Junior mur- 
mured "Never again." 

98 




1910 junior JBancc Committee 



Flora E. Dutton Marjorie C. Elmes Mary Haskell Ruth A. Harrington 

Helen Myrick Louise J, Randall Annie C. Perry 




1910 Senior iDance Committee 



Mildred Fuller May C. Martin Alice J. D. Sanborn Frances M. Whitcomb Ruth A. Harrington 
Dorothy E. Wakefield Olive J. Dunnican Annise B. Kane 



Commntmnmt Wttk 



Sunday, June 13, 3 p.m. 
Monday, June 20, 8 p.m. 
Tuesday, June 21, 4.30 p.m. 

7.30 p.m. 
Wednesday, June 22, 11 a.m. 

1 P.M. 

8 P.M. 

Thursday, June 23, 1 P.M. 



] baccalaureate Sermon 

Senior Dance 

Class Day Exercises — Spreads 

Glee Club Concert 

Commencement Exercises 

Luncheon given by Alumni to 
Class of 1910 

President's Reception 

Senior Luncheon 




101 




$t!)lttic0 



Athletics at Simmons has, in former years, Leen represented by 
an annual class tennis tournament. Although the tournament has every 
year aroused more and more enthusiasm, the need of an athletic organi- 
zation, basketball teams, and track practice has been strongly felt. This 
year the fitting out of a gymnasium in the new west wing of the college 
building marks the end of such a need. A committee is engaged in 
drawing up a constitution for the recently-organized Simmons Athletic 
Association. Class basketball teams have been formed and the first 
indoor meet held. Tennis courts and an athletic field are in the process 
of construction behind the west wing. The progress in athletics this 
year is largely due to the efforts of Miss Florence Diall, the instructor 
in physical training. Although only a beginning has been made, this 
has not been faint-hearted and it is easy to foresee the rapid growth of 
an enthusiastic athletic spirit in the next few years. 

104 




1910 -Basketball §>guato 



Charles K, Bolton, Honorary Manager J. Holly Hanford, Honorary Coach 

Daisy M. Miller Cornelia Reese Mary Haskell Alice G. Kendal I Blanche Webster Blanche D. Mills 
Catherine Casassa Olga F. Schroeder Annie C Perry Gertrude F. Barbour 




1911 basketball Squall 



Effie R. Beverley Marjorie F. Sutcliffe 
Madelaine L. Scott Margaret S. Davis Nellie M. Slack Mary E. Dunbar 

Jessie L. Blanchard Margaret Ridlon Marguerite F. Hawley Elizabeth G. Putnam 




1912 basketball &qttato 



Glenna M. True Lydia B. Ely Olive French 

Duise B Nissen Kathleen English Dora W. Moses Aldina A. L. Galarneau Margaret E. Becker Ida E. Adams Mildred R. Bowen H. Julia Pitn 

Harriet M. Bosworth Daisy J. McCormick Caroline E. Aldrich Alice A. Sheehan Ruth Symonds Elinor Whitney Mabel A. Magee 









1913 basketball ^qttato 



e Gurdy Inez J. Terrell Marjorie C. Chapman Henrietta J. Tufts Esther M . Symonds A. M. Kelly Hazel G. Glessner Clarissa G. Babcock 
Hope G. Carrell Annabel Porter Oriar, E Dyer Elizabeth M Walker Emily E. Woodward Dorothy Tyacke 
Dorothy W. Hughitt Mary W. Anderson Jeanette E. Pellman Marion S. Donaldson 



THE SIMMOrf&JMJMB 





S 




m 



s^ 




IB i it u n vf 




Dump 

The Dump 

Fenway Dump 

Oblige me by examining the Dump 

Every can that man could use 

All the ashes and the shoes 

Of the ages are on furlough in the Dump 

(Worn quite threadbare and cast out upon the Dump) 

And the ghost of cows forlorn 

Dreaming of some summer morn 

Wander there, and to and fro 

Pace, and chew the cud and low — 

You may see them as you gaze upon the Dump. 

Demons haunt there too, it seems ; 

Watch them round the fire that gleams 

Across the dusky Dump. 

So to all who love society 

In its infinite variety 

We issue invitations 

To the Dump. 




tf£j¥lattttaittcrs 



A College Drama of the Day 
In Several Acts 
Time: Before and after Midyear. 
Place : Snommis Female College. 

CAST 
College Spirit :a weakling-. 
Miss Nolarnd: a power. 
Mr. Oldhill: another power. 
Miss Sparrow : still another power. 
Faculty, Library Students, Secretarial Students, Household Ec 
Students, Others who aren't Students, C. G.'s, and College Cut-ups. 

ACT ONE 

Curtain rises and a scene in the college hall is discovered, the 
bulletin board at the background. At first there appears to be no one 
on the stage. In a minute a thin little girl with yellow hair is seen 
crouching timdly against the bulletin board. A blue flannel dress clings 
about her spare little figure. (This has the advantage of following the 
fashion and enhancing the pathos.) She comes forward falteringly 
and sings the touching child ballad : 

Won't somebody be kind to me? 

I'm very small, I know, 
But the College Grads and Specials 

They shove and hurt me so, 

They shove and hurt me so, 

They shove and hurt me so, 
Oh, the College Grads and Specials, 

They shove and hurt me so. 

(This unique opening is expected to take with the audience. They 
will probably express their appreciation by wiping their eyes on the 
back of one hand and clapping enthusiastically with the other.' Just 
as she finishes, a gay bunch of faculty dashes in, dressed in the con- 
ventional business costume. The gentlemen are wearing their favorite 

no 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

neckties. The leader of the chorus approaches the College Spirit and 
grasping her shoulder roughly, says : "How did you wander in here, my 
good waif? This is the wrong number. Seek succour elsewhere." 
C. S. exit, crying bitterly. Leader steps to the front and sings in a 
haughty baritone. 

Basketball with Radcliff e ! 

A preposterous idea ! 

It would lead the girls to holler 

It's not ladylike to cheer. 

Besides they might be recognized — • 

Their movements might be traced, 

And if Snommis girls should spotted be 

Snommis would be disgraced. 

After this they execute a short skirt dance and go off right. Just 
as the last one disappears with a coquettish kick, a bare-headed girl 
wearing a dark red sweater (and some other things) peeps around the 
corner. She comes tip-toeing cautiously on while the orchestra plays 
startled music; after looking about, she beckons to her companions 
who come running in, all bare-headed and in sweaters. The first girl 
sings the solo of "Don't Tell Them That You Saw Us and We Didn't 
Have a Hat." (As this show is not of the variety generally patronized 
by "friends of the college," we trust the chorus is safe). Every other 
line the drums bang and the chorus jump back on their toes aiert and 
listening. As an encore, the girls, having effected lightning changes, 
come on in gym suits and do a neat fencing dance, very difficult and 
complicated, which ought to bring down the house with the curtain. 

ACT TWO 

The curtain rises on a secretarial room in Snommis College. On 
the stage floor are seen six mammoth typewriters and beside each 
machine an enormous, powerful-looking eraser. Almost immediately 
Mr. Oldhill appears at centre, comes down to the front of the stage 
and strikes an attitude, with right forefinger warningly raised. The 
orchestra plays a bar and he sings in a hypnotic tenor, "If You Don't 
Have Forty Hours You Will Never Graduate." At the end of the 
second stanza commotion is heard from the direction of the typewriter 
on the extreme right, and the keys begin to jump at a furious rate. 
Pretty soon the bell rings and a tiny messenger boy enters, takes a 
telegram (automatically folded and sealed) from the machine and runs 
across with it to Mr. Oldhill, who stands spellbound with astonishment, 

in 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

finger still in mid-air. He takes the telegram, and forgetting to drop 
finger, dexterously opens it with his left hand and his teeth. The audi- 
ence waits tensely until he begins to read in a dazed fashion, "Cut it 
out. You look like P. Brooks trying to hail the car in front of Trinity." 
The actor, after a minute, crumples the paper furiously, drops his 
right hand, fingers opening and shutting with rage, and gives villain- 
ous glances at the daring typewriter. He is to be diverted from his 
wrath, however, by the applause of the audience (This is a precarious 
moment for the managers. If the audience shouldn't applaud, no one 
knows what would happen) which serves to produce a bow and a smile 
and the third stanza. Exit, singing the chorus. As he goes out, the 
typewriters and erasers arise and come forward and are seen to be the 
same chorus girls cf the last act, got up in clever disguise. An eraser 
starts a pandemonium by touching a typewriter and squealing "Tag." 
This is the signal for a rolicking, unconventional dance, which goes on 
to orchestra accompaniment until one of the Smiths cries, "You can't 
touch me, I've got my wires crossed." They form for a modernized 
Virginia Reel to the tune of "Erase Whene'er You Want To, But Be 
Sure You Don't Get Caught," and the curtain falls on the second act. 

ACT THREE 

The third act reveals a scene triumphantly laid in a Library Science 
room. A good deal of cackling is going on. A unique effect is gained 
by the device of having the chorus seated at desks. Local color is 
added by a poignant mixed odor of library paste and black ink. Each 
of the chorus is armed with a size ruler and a volume of the Library 
Journal. A library Senior enters from the left and approaches a desk 
occupied by a C. G. The following dialogue ensues : 

C. G., keeping on with the task in which she is absorbed: "Am I 
in your way?" 

Senior, giving contortionist exhibition in attempt to open top 
drawer: "Oh, no! Don't move." 

C. G. politely complies with this request. 

C. G. waxes communicative: "How much History of Libraries 
have you read?" 

Senior, out of breath: "Eighteen hours." 

C. G., tragically: "Heavens, woman, when?" 

Senior, taciturnly: "Second period this morning." 

Senior gives up attempt to get a book from the drawer, comes to 
the front and sings with feeling, 

112 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

When the College Grads have left us, Genevieve, 
There'll be nothing here that's really fit to leave. 

We'll be dead, I have no doubt 

And the front seats all worn out, 
When the College Grads have left us, Genevieve. 

C. G., petulantly: "This morning I had to waste forty-eight sec- 
onds on the front stoop before they opened the college door. And I 
didn't half finish my egg at breakfast." 

Miss Sparrow, strolling in, catches last words, comes sternly to 
front and sings with force, "Avoid Egg For Breakfast, Or You'll 
Never Get a Job." Seniors join in the chorus and the act closes 
spiritedly. 

ACT FOUR 

The fourth act is short but tense. The scene is the Household 
Economics Cooking Laboratory. The chorus wear aprons and carry 
mixing bowls and spoons. All are on one knee (one apiece) in an 
anxious semi-circle around the stove. A cooking instructor enters, 
comes down, opens the oven door, takes out a magnificent smelly struc- 
ture which she bisects. The semi-circle still anxious. The instructor 
scans the bisected structure and sings, 

It's very stylish outside, but it's awful gooey in, 

You must have breathed too heavy when you put it in the tin. 

If you ate this, you would die, 

Have a care next time you try, 
For it's very stylish outside, but it's awful gooey in. 
The chorus faints in a body and the curtain drops. 

ACT FIVE 

Scene same as in Act I. Miss Nolarnd, who was among the fac- 
ulty chorus in the first act, but had no speaking part, appears again 
as leader of the faculty chorus and comes down the stage singing that 
famous number in which humor and pathos are so cleverly mixed, 
"There'll Be Lots of Empty Places When the Marks Come Out." The 
chorus girls, in quaint, loose robes, besprinkled with birds, flowers, 
insects and what not, and wearing Turkish towels bound Grecian-wise 
below their pompadours, approach slowly with spiritless totter from 
right centre, disport with seeming carelessness opposite faculty chorus 
and sing with subdued sadness the ballad, "We've Been Boning Forty 
Minutes But It Aint No Use." During the last stanza they all fall 
gradually asleep ; the singing trails off into humming and finally de- 

113 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



velopes into snoring. Just before the final rendition of the refrain the 
familiar moving-picture-show commandment is thrown upon a screen, 
"All join in on the chorus." The scene should close effectively with 
audience and actors snoring rhythmically to dreamy orchestra music. 
[The curtain falls to indicate an elapse of four weeks.] 

SCENE II 
The curtain rises on the last scene and discovers the faculty chorus 
and the rejuvenated but meagre student chorus on opposite sides of the 



stage. 



The latter sings. 



Some say the ranks were high, 
And some say the ranks were low, 
But anyhow the ranks are rather thin. 

Still, we're cheerful now about it 

And you surely cannot doubt it, 
When you see the college spirit in our grin. 

College Spirit comes clambering in with one finger in her timid 
but friendly smile. She is unaccountably transformed into a healthy 
Mellins Food specimen. She turns towards the girls and they welcome 
her with true feminine cordiality and spontaneous outbursts of affec- 
tion. (The act is marvellous in emotional intensity and deserves highest 
mention). During this demonstration, the faculty exhibit an expres- 
sion first of disapproval and then of reluctant assent. Finally one sees 
in their faces the realization of the fact that the chosen few remaining 
are worthy to educate and advance the College Spirit. A smile of 
benign and gracious approbation flits across the countenance of Miss 
Nolarnd as she raises aloft the child, singing the old-time favorite, 
"Hail to Thee, Blithe Spirit." The curtain falls on a tableau. 




A FRESHMAN FROLIC 



%\>t Commuttr'0 Refrain 



We have hung on a strap together, 

And swayed with the lurching car. 
We have run the gamut of weather 
In trips from near and far. 

On the Fenway, oh, the Fenway, 

On a blistering summer day, 
When the sun beats down sans pity 
And the dust blows thick and gray. 

We have started in early morning 
And raced for the train we know 
Leaves time to escape the warning 
That waits for those who are slow. 
On the Fenway, oh, the Fenway, 

On a blustering winter day 
When the snow whirls high in fury 
And the tortured bushes sway. 

We have felt the old spring longing 

On a fragrant April day. 
We have heard the autos gonging. 
And the fragrance went away. 

On the Fenway, oh, the Fenway, 

On a near vacation day, 
When the birds sing high and gleeful 
And the world says "Come and play." 

WHY, WHY! 
Miss Harrington: "What's the matter with 'yours truly'?" 
Mrs Eldridge (hastily) : "Nothing!" 

IDENTIFYING IT 
Miss Roberts: "What kind of a clock?" 

Dr. Underwood: "Oh, like the one on the wall — tame clock — 
domestic clock, you know." 

BARGAINING 

Miss Jacobs: "In the exam shall we have to write samples of all 
the themes we've ever written ?" 

Dr. Hanford : Oh, no, only remnants." 

ii5 



©missions from ttyt Curriculum 

By a Well-wisher 

We hear from those well qualified to speak from experience, that 
a new exercise entitled "Two Hours Daily Work with the Burroughs 
Adding Machine," has recently been introduced into the Secretarial 
School. Well, it was high time. The pressure on the lever of this 
machine is something like ten pounds to the square inch, and in operat- 
ing it steadily for one hundred and twenty minutes without a pause, 
guarded by one of the vigilant Watch-Dogs of the Secretarial Depart- 
ment, it forms a pleasant little relaxation on a spring afternoon as a 
climax to a day of strenuous application on the classical and technical 
end of the course, besides being a nerve and muscle strengthener of no 
mean dimensions. 

As we take our somewhat stubby lead pencil in hand to pen this 
article, a telegram comes in from the camp of that greatest American 
of modern times, Mr. James Jeffries, future defender of the supremacy 
of the white race, to the following effect : 

"Can Jeff come back? Well, we guess yes. The Burroughs Add- 
ing Machine has done it. Credit where it is due. Two weeks ago, Mr. 
Jeffries weighed 350 lbs., was weak as an infant, muscles flabby as 
cotton-batting. The Burroughs Adding Machine was brought into 
camp on a dray drawn by eight large army mules, and hailed by Jeff 
and his trainers with buoyant satisfaction. Now see what the B. A. M. 
has accomplished in a fortnight. To-day, Mr. Jeffries weighs only 
105 lbs., is able to read an account of a day's work at Simmons College 
without visible signs of exhaustion, and his biceps measure, in repose, 
24 1-2 inches. Send us another." 

All this is interesting and to the point, but why do we stop here? 
Are there not other equally needed innovations? Let us consider the 
not at all remote contingency of a Simmons Graduate, having survived 
the college training table and the rigors of the Back Bay climate, ac- 
cepting a position with one of the big ship-building concerns. Now, 
in the matter of pounding rivets on an armored cruiser, would she not 
be considered deficient in experience? It seems to us that a counterfeit 
iron deck could easily be planned on the top of Mrs. Gardner's Museum 
of Fine Arts, from which one of our adaptable and omnipotent faculty 
could easily toss a white-hot rivet to be caught between large tongs by 
a pupil of the Secretarial Department, and rapidly pounded into the 

116 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



South end of the building, which for the purpose should have a light 
staging erected. In the winter, mittens should be worn for this work. 

Again, presupposing the unoffending graduate to have taken a 
position with the city. The question naturally arises : Is her pick- 
and-shovel work up to the Chautauqua standard ? Has better, speedier, 
more efficient work been done elsewhere? Can she mentally plan and 
physically execute a trench in less time than the untutored Dago? Has 
she done it, not once but constantly during her college career? Dear 
me, no, overlooked completely. 

Of course, one poor faculty cannot adequately supply the missing 
links among all the students' faculties, but will they not consider before 
another year, the following supplementary Senior subjects: 

1. Invention, construction, and application of the cotton-gin, 
printing-press, and spinning- jenny. 

2. Direction and practical demonstration of the use of the steam- 
roller, sub-divided into three courses : 

A. Stone-crushing. 

B. Road-rolling. 

C. Firing and cleaning engine on aforesaid machine. 

We trust these suggestions will not be brushed lightly aside, for 
when on the high road to perfect efficiency, push on to the goal, heeding 
not mental fatigue, physical exhaustion, muscular paralysis, dire mis- 
fortune, fatal disease, nay, pause not, in danger of being put on the 
card catalogue, for Death itself. 




117 




lips arto 




Instructog: Why did you close the window? 

Secretarial Junior, absent-mindedly : Why, the transcript 
was open and I felt a draft. 

Miss Wiggin : Whatever you do, girls, don't make trouble for 
your predecessors. 

Senior (reading shorthand transcript) : Your favor of the 32nd 
received — 

Miss Mitzlaff: In the recent future — 

Miss Mitzlaff, telling class the history during Joan of Arc's time 
is interupted by wise Junior: Why, Miss Mitzlaff, I thought Richard 
HI came before Richard II. 

YOU KNOW WHO 
With History One 
And History Two 
He's almost driven mad. 
With Reading slips 
And Conferences 
No wonder he looks sad. 

With carrying books 
And lunch for two 
And dodging girls in the hall 
And Genealog- 
ical References 
You can see why he yawns at us all. 

He has quizes galore, 

Bibliographies too, 

And he needs relief from his care, 

So along towards night 

Down in one-thirty-eight 

He secretly plays solitaire. 

YES, INDEED 
Freshman (opening door of English office and looking in: "Is 
Mr. Hanford here?" 

Miss Holbrook : "Well, why don't you look around and then 



guess?" 



118 



THE MICROCOSM i 9 to 

PHILOSOPHY 

Should you ask me whence these groanings, 
Whence these moans and imprecations, 
With the wrinkled, anxious forehead, 
With the face grown white so sudden, 
With the eyes sharp points of color, 
Color greatly changed from normal, 
With the thin, dilated nostrils, 
With the tightening of the red lips, 
And the raised and sharpened voices 
As of those who cry in anguish, 
I should answer, I should tell you 
'Tis emotion 'roused by memory, 
An emotion I'll allow you 
To decide on from the symptoms — 
'Roused by memory of a class room 
Filled with forty girls or over, 
Girls with light hair and with dark hair, 
Girls with brains and girls without 'em, 
Girls with faculties of bluffing, 
Bluffing which determines high marks — ■ 
Roused by memory of instructor, 
Who, himself, per se, and as such, 
Lectured, lectured, lectured, lectured, 
Lectured volubly and clearly 
With his feet in ten positions, 
Ten original positions, 
And his eyes upon a point 
In that second row of Seniors — 
'Roused by memory of a percept, 
'Roused by memory of a concept, 
'Roused by many vivid memories. 
Should you ask me to relate you 
Some experiences met there, 
I should answer, I should tell you 
Of a poor frog near the window — 
Frog that hopped when it was prodded, 
Hopped and greedily ate sawdust, 
Gobbled sawdust with such pathos 
That our hearts were wrung to see 'it, 

119 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



Tho' 'twas all imagination, 
It was only in the mind's eye. 
I should answer, I should tell you 
Of a heated controversy 
'Twixt a student and instructor 
All about a common chalk-box 
Which he held against his stomach 
While exhorting thus the student, 
"For example, take this chalk-box — 
Is there anything behind it 
Does it seem to you, Miss Johnson ?" 
Courtesy repressed the answer, 
Truth compelled her to keep silence, 
But the courtesy of the Seniors 
Was not equal to such straining, 
Burst they into gleeful laughter, 
Burst they into shaking giggles, 
Well, oh well, they know the answer, 
Nothing cryptic to that riddle, 
Not a bit of doubt about it. 
Later they encountered questions, 
Deep and darksome, all-embracing 
Infinite in chance for thinking — 
Questions awesome and terrific, 
Problems such as these that follow : 
"Is the green wall green or yellow?" 
"Db I see a desk before me?" 
(Said in agitated manner 
Quite as tragic as Macbeth's words) 
"Will the chalk fall if I drop it- 
Will it fall or stay in mid-air?" 
And some others quite as dreadful, 
Quite as puzzling and as hopeless. 
Then they heard of Aristotle, 
Heard of him and read his writings. 
('Twas by graft he got 'em printed) 
Which impose upon the public, 
The long-suffering reading public, 
And they jilted him for Plato, 
Ten times worse for ten times longer, 

120 






THE MICROCOSM 1910 

Plato, who believed in justice 
So he could not help but talk it, 
Talked of it from morn till evening, 
Didn't stop to eat his dinner ; 
Then (most cowardly and disgraceful) 
Went and blamed it on another, 
Socrates he shoved it onto, 
Poor old Soc, all dead and buried, 
(Maybe burned — oh, who remembers?) 
Gone where he could not deny it, 
Gone where he could not refute it, 
Passed away and gone forever. 
Next (oh, yes, I've almost finished) 
Were the Cynics forced upon them, 
Questions asked about their theories : 
"What, oh what was that great spirit 
Which rose up before all men with 
'I don't care' as its chief motto?" 
Someone answered "Eva Tanguay," 
Someone risked a flunk and answered, 
Pained and hurt was the instructor 
And 'twas long ere he recovered. 
Sadly he went on to lecture, 
Soaked it to them worse than ever, 
Soaked it to them four times weekly 
All about five hundred ninnies — 
But I'm going to let you off now 
It is time to quit this droning. 
Go lie down and think it over 
Go lie down and offer praises 
That 'tis written by a student 
Who has had unusual chances, 
Understands the human brain and 
Recognizes thus its limits 
All because she had the course in, 
Had the crust to take the course in 
That Philosophy and Ethics 
Offered by the administrators, 
Wise and great administrators, 
To the girls who go to Simmons, 
Pampered girls who go to Simmons. 




THE HARVARD 
MAN'S 
THOUGHTS 
IN THE 
FENWAY 



Inconstant star that rules my fate 
Through life's most devious way, 

Is thy caprice not satiate, 

That thou dost tempt me from the straight 

And narrow path of faithful state 
By such decoy, today, 

And makst me linger when I'm late 
And should be on my way? 

You know to Grace at Wellesley there, 

And Clara back at Rad, — 
And Eleanor at Smith — (I swear 
I never saw such corking hair!) 
I said that I'd — ■ 

(I wonder where 

A knockdown's to be had, — ) 
O, star, why don't you use me square? 

Great guns, I've got it bad! 



122 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

REST ROOM RULES 

I. Kindly make as much noise as possible about entering. Squeak- 
ing the door has an especially soothing effect on a sick headache. 

1. a. If you can't get time to come in, be sure to look in. That is 
quite as efficacious. 

2. Don't hesitate in the least to use all the pillows. Girls who 
feel really ill do not realize whether they have one or not. 

3. Please throw all your books on the floor, one by one, taking 
as long as you please about it. It creates an ideal atmosphere for rest. 

4. Scrape and haul your chair about often, turn leaves of books 
loudly, and sigh deeply at intervals of five seconds. 

5. If a friend should be present, converse volubly with her across 
the room over various humorous outside subjects. Those studying are 
interested and can think better. 

6. When ready to leave, excite interest in your actions and 
arouse commotion by singing, dancing, etc. 

7. Ahvays slam the door. Those disobeying final injunction, 
No. 7, will be fined and forbidden use of rest room during the remainder 
of the college year. 

SPRINGTIME 

The cow walks chewing here and there 

While I sit on a rock 
In the wild, wide waste ,of Fenway, 

Eating Alfred's last year's stock. 

I am not jealous of the cow 

Or her placidity, 
For thanks to Alfred's last year's stock 

I chew as long as she. 

TIME TELLS 

Student (in sewing) : "But Miss — , aren't these sleeve patterns 
rather full?" 

Teacher: "Well, we've been using them for several years and 
they've been all right." 

FOLLOWED IT BY ABOUT THIRTY YEARS 

Dr. Dewing: "Those of you who followed the discussion in the 
early sixties, will remember — " 

123 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

THOSE CONGRESSIONAL RECORDS 
Portion of a speech overheard after hours : 

The ways of Providence and Miss Jackson are hard. We know 
that they are right, but in our impotence we cannot understand ; we 
dumbly suffer and trust. But out of our present misery, she will, in 
her own good time, work us up to a commendable rate of speed and 
degree of ability. 

HORRORS ! 

Dr. Dewing: f 'Do you have Miss Dunnican in the Science 
Course, Dr. Stiles?" 

Dr. Stiles: "Yes, she's the one ewe lamb in the class." 
Dr. Dewing: "The one I lam!" 

We Would Like To See 

Maclachlan's prices fall 

The faculty at Chapel 

Copy for the Microcosm 

Dr. Han ford in his office chair at scheduled times 

A Tech dorm in the Fenway 

M. Fuller on time 

Miss Arnold without a special invitation 

"Doc" Johnson without an answer 

Somebody angry — Psych class 

Chapel Day without a headache 

Herr Grossman in the same suit twice a week 

A chance to cut for fun 

Dr. Andrews — minus his sidestep chasse gait 

Louis Pasteur Avenue 

Dr. Ogg contradicting someone flatly 

The Library girls at work 

Mr. Hastings with his moustache again 

J. Van Liew Morris at a Suffragette meeting 

First period recitation — with lessons prepared 

Dr. Stiles without his little joke 

A man — without a chaperone 

Final exams — beforehand 

We Would Like To Hear 
The Choir 

124 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

"GRADU DI VERSO, UNA VIA" 

Hear the tired, weary tapping of a foot upon the stair — 
'Tis a Senior toiling- upward and we've caught her unaware, 
Hear her panting, gasping breath, 
She is worked almost to death. 

For it's four years — four flights — 
Clinmbing mornings — noons — night, 
Work — work — work — it will give you your degree, 
But the Seniors hate the journey to the Li-bra-ry. 

Hear the slow, uncertain shuffling of a foot upon the stair, 
'Tis a Junior mounting upward, she has troubles, too, to bear ; 
Oh, they do pile up the work, 
But a Junior is no shirk, 

Tho' it's four years — four flights — 
Climbing mornings — noons — nights, 
Toil — toil — toil — if a Senior you would be, 
So the Juniors brave the journey to the Li-bra-ry. 

Hear the stealthy, creepy squeaking of a foot upon the stair — 
'Tis a Soph'more stealing upward — for till now this thing was rare; 
But there's something now to do — 
(She's afraid she won't get through) 
And it's four years — four flights- — ■ 
Climbing mornings — noons — nights, 
March — march- — march — for you need it, all can see, 
So the Sophs endure the journey to the Li-bra-ry. 

Hear the mad, hilarious racing of a foot upon the stair — 
'Tis a Freshie prancing upward, and she has no earthly care; 
She's just glad to live and grin, 
And she doesn't care a pin 

For the four years — four — flights 
Climbing mornings — noons — nights, 
Skip — hop — jump 1 — for her dancing heart is free, 
And the Freshies love the journey to the Li-bra-ry. 

SO SOON? 
Dr. Hanford (reading an Old English song) : "Well, that title 
translated means 'My love's gone to the country.' ' 

125 



r "You'd better ask Dr. Kingsbury." 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

WAFTINGS FROM OLYMPUS 

Dr. Eldridge: "Ladies, what happened to the Transcript yester- 
day. Now at Lake George last summer — " 

Miss Robbins (rapping on the desk) : "Young ladies, there are 
people doing practice work in this room." 

Miss Cook: "Don't say T don't think.' If you don't think, don't 
talk." 

Dr. Hanford: "That's great stuff. The trick is — " 

Miss Craig: "Now, girls, the spelling was v-e-r-y bad." 

Mr. Hastings: "A happy phrase, of course, is — " 

Miss Jackson : "The period does not close until twenty minutes 
of twelve." 

Dr. Dewing: "In the last analysis, per se, jest sech — Oh, Miss 
Dunnican, did you smile? Oh, I thought — " 

Miss Holbrook: "Please clasp the door. Anyhow — " 

Dr. Norris: "Well, when the girl came up and spoke to me, of 
course I had to — " 

Dr. Andrews, 

Dr. Ogg: 

Dr. Underwood: "Speaking of policemen, when we were playing 
ball in Paris—" 

Dr. Kingsbury: "Make an outline — " 

Miss Howard: "Now you know, girls, I never like to scold — " 

Miss Dike: "Someone in my family suffered from — •" 

Miss Parker: "When I was in Syracuse — " 

Dr. Campbell (before making an experiment) : "Now, if we are 
successful — •" 

Mr. Moyer: "Of course you don't understand, but just go 
ahead — ■" 

SINGULAR! 

Dr. Underwood: "Here's an Italian simile, 'The woman was as 
lonesome as asparagus.' Do you think it refers to the way the plant 
grows?" 

Professor Goodell: "No, I think it refers to the way they serve 
it in American hotels." 

A DISCOVERY 
What is it that has only the dimensions of length and breadth? 
Answer : Lunch-room butter. 

126 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



REMARKABLE EVENTS OF THE YEAR 

Dr. Hanford appears in English with his other necktie. 

Hot soup is served in the lunch-room. 

Student gets a free ride in the elevator. 

L. Randall hands in theme on time. 

The organ ends with the choir. 

A Junior pays her Guild dues. 

Twelve of the faculty appear at chapel. 

Miss Ridlon forgets to say neyther. 

Miss Diall is seen without a retinue of Sophs. 

G. Barbour refrains from cutting for a week. 

D. Wakefield contributes to Senior candy sale. 

Sonhomores conduct class meeting according to Parliamentary law. 

SOPH ON JUNIOR PROM NIGHT 

I never cared before to-night 

To roll the years away, 
But now I wish a twelve-month 

Would turn into a day. 



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127 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



PEN SKETCHES OF POPULAR INSTRUCTORS 



Most obviously popular 
Of all the powers that be 

Is the Living Ink Eradi- 
cator, E. R. E. 





The Forceful advertisement 
Of good humor's due to him. 

He makes Chem. Lab. attractive, 
And is known as Sunny Jim. 



128 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



A certain French professor 

(We know this joke's not funny — 

We blush with shame to say it) 

But it's true — they call him Honey. 





The embodiment of dignity, 
The prince of witty wiles — 

We wonder why we love so well 
Our Walter Baker Stiles. 



129 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 




A vote for popularity 
Would show not far behind 
That Napoleonic Lady 
With the Economic mind. 



Oh, listen to him, Ladies, 

His protegees are many. 
He bustles 'round with clucking- sound, 

They call him Eddie Henny. 





By some he's thought an Easy Mark. 

Unblushingly they're punny. 
But anyway to everyone 

He's better known as Bunny. 



130 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 




The Infant Prodigy behold. 

He writes Philosophy. 
All by himself he does it — 

The illustrious Per Se. 



CAUGHT IT ON THE BOUNCE 

Madame M : "Give me the verb 'to graze,' Miss G ." 

Miss G (whose thoughts were elsewhere) : "What?" 

Madame M : "The verb 'to graze,' Miss G 'to graze.' In 

what do horses graze?" 

Miss G (in sudden enlightenment, with abrupt frankness of 

knowledge): "Grass!" 

GEMS OF WIT FROM GERMAN 1 
Herr Grossman: "Miss , how compares the adjective 



gross 



Miss 



"Gross, grosser, grossman — " and it's nice she "mum- 



bled her words." 

Student (translating into German ) : "Er kam- — no — kam er — 
no — er kam — ■ 

Herr G (gracefully fainting against blackboard) : "Oh, no, 

no, no! Ne-f-er must you change — unless I shriek!" 

WE WANT TO KNOW 
Miss Diall (to Freshman) : "You play second half." 
Freshman: "Where's that?" 

OBLIGING 

Senior (to Freshman) : Miss , do you play first or second 

mandolin ?" 

Freshman (modestly) ; "It really doesn't matter — I have two." 

131 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

A LA WORDSWORTH 

Author's note : Gazing from the College window, thinking of my 
English reading, I was much struck by the cheerful industry of the 
humble junkmen gathering untold treasures from The Dump. At once 
I thought of the way Wordsworth himself would have treated such a 
subject, and hence the following, which I consider one of the most 
spiritual of my compositions. 

The day outside is warm and bright, 

Let's leave our studies gloomy, 
And in the sunshine and the light, 

Enjoy the Fenway roomy! 

Of Wordsworth's teachings then have done! 

Let's put them into being! 
And in the warm and pleasant sun, 
All nature's joy be seeing. 

We'll watch the swans gaily disport 

On Muddy River's breast ; 
Their raptures shall our fancy court — 

But, Ah ! the Dump is best ! 

For there the junkman mildly glad, 

Pursues his humble trade. 
And I confess I'm almost sad 

To see what finds he's made. 

One lesson, junkman, every day 

You unto us may give — 
If no one threw such junk away, 

How could the junkmen live? 

EXAM TIME 
Our Honor System faith abounding has. 

Some schools employ the wily proctor's art. 
But, no, they trust us, and to prove this so, 

They place all chairs at least ten feet apart. 



13; 



THE MICROCOSM 



1 910 



WHAT THE TYPEWRITER SAID 

A Freshman came to Simmons once 

With aspirations high. 
They took her to a typewriter 

And bade her fingers fly. 

They set before her there a chart 
With letters green and blue, 

And the first letter that she made 
They told her must be U. 

"Now left, now down," the teacher said, 

She did as she was told ; 
But when she pulled the carriage up 

She felt a shudder cold. 

For there in black and white she saw 
What long she feared was true. 

The canny typewriter had writ 
U Y U, U J U. 




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The above caption, as of course nearly everybody knows now, is 
abbreviation of Simmons Annual Anthology, the first volume of 
which, culled from the inedited metrical effusions of the Officers of 
Instruction and Administration, is shortly to appear. This notice, which 
is to serve as a preliminary announcement, is an account of part of my 
Odyssey, as editor-in-chief in quest of material, and it is intended to 
give an idea of the difficulties and perils attending the endeavor as well 
as a sample of the contents of the Anthology. 

When I went to the President for copy, my speech was all ready. 
"Dr. Bolton tells me you have a faculty for writing verse," I said. 
"I have," he acknowledged. "Will you give me something for the 
Anthology?" "No," he replied, "I haven't time. Why should I write 
verse, when, as you say, I have a Faculty for it? Go to the Faculty. 
Next." The President smiled, but the atmosphere was wintry as his 
answer was summary. It seemed unseasonable to stay longer. I took 
the proffered advice and went to the Faculty. At the Dean's office I 
was told I could not have an interview until eighteen minutes past three 
the following Thursday, and I must be punctual as the Dean had another 
appointment at 3.19 and a tea at 3.20. I started to drop in on the 
German department, but music halted me ; a trio — soprano, barytone 
and tenor — was rendering strange words to a familiar air. Blessing 
Professor Eldridge and the whole German department for my two- 
edged training, I stopped and took down the words in shorthand. I 
transcribe here only the refrain : 

Liebchen du, 

Hore mal zu : 

Ich wage nicht nach Hause nachts zu gehen 

An alien Tagen 

Die Zeitungen sagen : 

"DIEBSTAHL IM PARK GESCHEHEN ;" 

Drum sass ich allein in dem Y. M. C. A. 

Singend wie tausend Krahen : 

Es giebt kein Platz wie zu Hause, 

Aber nachts wag' ich nicht dahin gehen. 

Involuntarily I applauded, though the door remained closed. 
There was a prompt response : 

i35 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



Ringe 11111 die Finger, Schellen an den Zehen, 

Elefanten zur Spazierenfahrt wohin ich auch mag gehen, 

So komm — 

"Es sincl aber nicht Schellen," interrupted Herr Professor Gross- 
mann. "Es sind lieber Klingeln, nicht wahr, Fraulein?" "Weder 
Klingeln noch Schellen," was the answer. "Glocken sind es ; wenn 
man von hinreichender Grosse ist, Elefanten zum Spazierfahren benut- 
zen zu kcnnen, so hat man selbstverstandlich Zehen von einer aus- 

serordentlichen " Professor Nichols interceded : "Die Wahrheit 

liegt zwischen " But I was looking for Dichtung, not Wahrheit, 

so naturally I passed on to the Romance department. Professor Good- 
ell was asking Madame Mottet how many hospitals there were, 
approximately, in La Ferte-sous Jouarre in 1768. Madame blushed 
enough to match the wattles of her Chantecler hat. "I really can't 
remember," she said. I said : "Professor Goodell, I want a poem for 
the Anthology." "Certainly," he replied obligingly, "Epic, elegiac or 
lymric ? Sit down at the typewriter; Fll dictate." "Make it local," 
J said, "but not about the dump." ( You know there's been literature 
enough written about the dump to fill it up). "Give us another side 
of Simmons ; Ruggles Street, for instance." "Very well," he said, and 
began dictating: 

I know a kind policeman who 

Patrols on Ruggles Street, 
I call his club a billy doux, 

His round a sugar beat. 

He's friendly from his stubby toe 

Up to his helmet's brim, 
He never takes me up, although 

Pm taken up with him. 

When life at Simmons loses zest, 

I sally forth to see 
My copper make a kind arrest — 

It is a rest for me. 

And yet, though curiosity 

Is thought a deadly sin, 
Whenever I run out to see 

He never runs me in. 




136 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

Sometimes we quaff the foamy cheer 

Before he goes his round ; 
One day (alas!) they'll take his bier 

To Copps Hill burying-ground. 

I stopped him there. I hold the record for speed from dictation, 
but it wasn't up to the fine frenzy of Professor Goodell's impromptus ; 
moreover, I was shocked at the implication of the last stanza and I 
remonstrated. "The beer?" he asked. "Poetic licence." And he ex- 
plained that unusual latitude might be conceded to one who spends his 
weeks at Simmons and his week-ends in Maine. I went on. I stopped 
at the biology office, but it was vacant. In the class-room beyond, 
however, written on the blackboard in a familiar and legible hand was 
the following: 

POX BOBUSCUM 

Of the germs of disease he was warned, 
But he ate of the beef that was corned : 

Don't mock at the plight 

Of the innocent wight — 
He is more to be pitted than scorned. 

There are nature-fakers outside of the philosophy courses. 1 
erased this awful thing, but first I made a fair copy. 

A quartet from the choir was practicing sotto voce in the corridor 
near the chemistry department. It's melodious, but then so does the 
chemistry department, I thought in familiar Holmesp'un. I listened 
for the words : 

"Ev'ry morn we send him violets — " 
1 understood. Death loves a shining Mark, you know, but Simmons 
needs him more. Inside the office I asked for poetry. "Sure," said 
Professor Norris, "anything you like." "Tell muh, then," I murmured, 
"the story of your life; we all know that under the deep masque of 
melancholy you always wear, lies the bitter tragedy of a thwarted 
career. What are your soulful yearnings? What — — " "That'll do," 
he said, "I see what you mean." And he went on : 

I sometimes think I wish I might 

Have been another man, 
Reputed as a shining light 

And not an also ran : 
But when to one my wish I curb, 
Some snake is lurking in the herb. 

i37 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 




^ 



I'd like to be a Socrates, 

A lake of lavish lore, 
With pupils prostrate at my knees, 

Disciples by the score : 
But Xantippe ! and then I'd hate 
To take my stein of hemlock straight. 

Sometimes the fancy strikes me that 

I'll play Napoleon 
And knock down kingdoms with my bat 

To see the kinglets run : 
But Saint Helena is so far 
From Boston where my interests are. 

And other times I think that I 

Should like to be a Nero 
And riddle at the firelit sky 

Like some Wagnerian hero : 
But though an operatic star 
They say he wasn't popular. 



\ 



Here the Professor was stopped by a girl with a test-tube and an 
appealing voice. "Dr. Evans will continue the yearns for you," he 
said; "the efficiency of our department depends on the adaptibility of 
each of its members, at any time, to supply the place of any other." 
Dr. Evans adjusted his carmine cravat and continued: 



Sometimes I think I should prefer 

To be like Julius Caesar ; 
He fought and wrote and made a stir, 

The versatile old geezer: 
But when "Tu Brute" thought him gay 
His finish wasn't far away. 



138 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



And then again I cast my vote 
For Shakespeare too, at times : 

He was a poacher and he wrote 
Some very clever rhymes : 

But then I might get thirty days, 

And maybe Bacon wrote the plays. 




Sometimes like Washington I've planned 

Such little stunts as these : 
To be the father of the land 

And cut down cherry-trees : 
But Georgie never told a lie, 
He must be lonely in the sky. 

The more I think of it, the more 

I think I'd rather be 

No demi-godhead to adore. 

But only little me : 
There is this argument beside : 
I couldn't help it if I tried. 

If I consulted only my own feelings, I should suppress what hap- 
pened to me in the English department. It was there (since candor 
bids me tell all ) that I counted on my masterpiece, and might have got 
it ; but I had now developed a certain confidence which, for once, got 
the better of my tact, for I said breezily to Dr. Hanford: "I've come 



i39 



THE MICROCOSM 1910 

to see you, Prof., about some poetry for the Anthology." "That's 
enough," he said. "If you ever call anyone 'Prof.' again, I hope you 
may not get off as easily as, by grace of your cosmic ignorance, you 
are going to get off this time. 'Prof.' may stand for Professor, but I 
have never known any professor who would stand for 'Prof.' Good 
afternoon." 

I only got over this blow in time to keep my Thursday appointment 
with the Dean. She received me affably, but regretted that discretion, 
not to say expediency, prompted her to withold temporarily certain con- 
tributions which under happier auguries and not impossible eventual 
circumstances she might divert to the uses of the Anthology, which 
enterprise she emphatically, even enthusiastically, indorsed. Then she 
?aw that I was disappointed and that there were only seven seconds 
left. "On second thought, though," she beamed, "here is the manu- 
script of some verses left here by Mr. Walliam Witson, who passed 
through incognito last month and gave me this impression de voyage. 
Though not in the ultimate analysis an indigenous product, its inspira- 
tion is local — indeed, this office would be grateful if its publicity 
could throw some light on the identity of the cryptically anonymous 

protagonists — Miss Blank, I sent for you to ask " The Dean was 

keeping her 3.19 appointment and I sidled out to read the manuscript 
? he had handed me : 

Professor X., who has a taking way 

(He thinks), was strolling with a somewhat young 

Blithe Junior, when he heard a Freshman say : 
"There goes the woman with the serpent's tongue." 

The soft and smug professor turned his head 

(The only head he'd ever turned, I fear) 
And to his fair companion sweetly said: 

"I note you have a reputation here." 

She murmured lightly: "Were your hearing good 

Or if you knew your sobriquet among 
Your loving pupils, you'd have understood: 

'There goes a woman with the serpent. Stung!' " 

The question of identification, I leave an open one. The Anthology, 
shortly to appear, comprises about four hundred poems, including "Ye 
mariners of England," acknowledged by both Doctors Campbell — when 
doctors disagree, we don't decide — love sonnets of a stenographer, 

140 



THE MICROCOSM 



1910 



( edited ) by Professor Eldridge ; die prologue to a comic opera by 
Professor Parker ; The Call of die Dump, or the Summons to Simmons 
— joint effort of the committee on admission — and this is but a random 
selection of average merit. The Anthology will be sold by subscription 
only and orders may be left with any member of the editorial board 
of the Microcosm. The price is $10, of which $9.90 is due at the time 
of subscription and the balance upon delivery of the books, of which 
the edition will be strictly limited and the copies numbered. Imme- 
diately after the issue the plates are to be destroyed by Cooking 1 stu- 
dents of guaranteed competency. 




141 





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VI 



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VII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



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VIII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



FRESHMAN PHILOSOPHY 
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MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




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XII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




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XIII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




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XIV 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



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xv 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



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XVI 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



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XVII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



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XVIII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



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XIX 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



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Editors of the Microcosm — 

Fire in each eye, and papers in each hand 
They rage, recite, and madden round the land. 

Before the Ethics Exam. — "Wretched, un-idea'd girls !"' 

A moral to be considered by our professors — "A man ought to 
read just as inclination leads him ; for what he reads as a task will do 
him little good. — Sam Johnson. 



19K 



-Towering in the confidence of twenty-one. 
Gloomy calm of idle vacancy. 

?— A mighty hunter and his prey was man. 

The Seniors, June 16 — Dogs, ye have had your day. 

Class meeting — No season now for calm, familiar talks. 

Office after Mid-years — And not a man appears to tell their fate. 

To Chapel — All, soon or late, are doom'd that path to tread. 



xx 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



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XXI 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



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xxn 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



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Pres. Hamilton's Res. 
Prof Lewis's Res. 
Prof. Cush man's Res. 
Prof. Knight's Kts. 
Prof. Tousey's Res. 
Delta Tau Delta Club 
Delta Upsilon Club 

Dartmouth College 
Tuck Hall 
Webster Hall 
Dormitory '05 

Andover Academy 
Gymnasium 

Exeter Academy 
Dunbar Hall 

Normal and Latin Schools 
Fenway, Boston 



by this Company 

Mt. Pleasant School 

Washington, D. C. 

High School 

Maiden, Mass. 
Jefferson School 

Boston, Mass. 
Lane-Johnson School 

Washington, D. C. 
Plunkett School 

Pittsfield, Mass. 
St. Mary's School 

Melrose, Mass. 
Mrs. Sargent's School 
Gymnasium 

Matteawan, N. V. 
High School 

Rockland, Mass 
Seventh Ward School 
Maiden, Mass. 



tT'OR twenty years the systematic 

cleaning of residences, stores 

and offices has been our business. 

Estimates cheerfully furnished for 
floor cleaning and oiling, window 
and paint cleaning. 

Carpet Cleaning 
Vacuum Cleaning 

I he Buildings Care Co. 

1 28 Bedford Street Boston 

Tel. Oxford 104 



THE 



LOMBARD BLOUSE 

For COLLEGE GIRLS 



Made in 

Serge 

Flannel 

and 

Wash 

Materials 




We Have 
No Agents 

Send for 

Illustrated 

Booklet 



HENRY S. LOMBARD 

YACHTING UNIFORMS 
22-26 Merchants Row, Boston, Mass. 



XXIII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



"A very merry, dancing, drinking, laughing, quaffing, unthinking 
time." — Summer Vacation. 



Ethics Class — He that complies against his will 
Is of his own opinion still. 





Crockery, China and 
Glassware 



The Athena Pattern. 
French China. 



The newest shapes and decorations of 
TABLE WARE and ORNAMENTAL 
PIECES constantly arriving from the best 
Potteries and Glass Factories of England, France, Germany, Austria, China, Japan and 
America. Patrons will find extensive exhibits in 

Dinner Set Department Art Pottery Rooms 

Glassware Department tamp Department 

Stock Pattern Department Hotel and Club Department 

In our KITCHENWARE DEPARTMENT is an extensive variety of Souffle Dishes, 
Egg Poachers, Cafetierers, Casseroles, Cocottes, Shirred Egg Dishes, etc., in French 
Porcelain and other wares. Also plain and decorated wares for kitchen and pantry. The 
Blue Willow pattern in full assortment. Yellow Mixing Bowls and Nappies, Blanc Mange 
Moulds, Blue Edge Pie Plates, etc. 

Students' Requisites 

Lamps, Tea Sets, Chocolate Pots and Sets, Candlesticks, Welsh Rarebit Plates, 
Jardinieres, Ferneries, Bureau Sets, Bon Bon Dishes, Plates of all kinds, odd Pitchers in 
endless variety, as well as Bric-a-Brac suitable for complimentary and wedding gifts. 
Glassware of all grades. Inspection invited. 

Jones, McDuffee (SL Stratton Co. 

China and Glass Merchants 

33 franklin, cor. Hawley Streets Near Washington and Summer Streets 

XXIV 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



EIMER & AMEND 

205-211 THird Ave., NEW YORli 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

(flljpmtrai Apparatus 
nnb 01. fl. (EljFmtralfi 




Laboratory Glass Ware 
Balances and Weights 
Hammered Platinum Ware 
Fuel & Gas Testing Apparatus 
ll Assay Goods, Furnaces, etc. 



(Enntplrtr laboratory 
lEqutpmrnt 




DELICIOUS 

CHOCOLATES, BONBONS 

ICE CREAM SODA and 

COLLEGE ICES 



1 46 Tremont St., 4 1 4 Boylston St. 

1 39 Summer St. 



Compliments of a Friend 



BOSTON 



MASS. 



XXV 




- '' ■ j£fmi ■ " • v\i. '''-'JSP ^^i idt'A 



The Young Bride's Ally 

Culinary inexperience is a formidable handicap to the young bride 
who has slated out to make her husband comfortable and keep him happy. 
At this critical peJod blessed is she who can cook. 

Only when preparing dessert is the housewife with no experience in 
cooking on the same footing as her more accomplished sisler. Both using 




serve the same delicious desserts, their preparation requiring 
no greater skill than the ability to "boil water." 

They can be made in a mnute. 

Nothing short of magic could produce dishes so delightful 
and so beautiful from any other material. 

They are so good that they cover up very agreeably the 

deficiencies of any dinner. 

Highest award Gold Medals received at tine St. Louis, 
Portl^Md and Jamestown Expositions are toikens oS 
practical recognition of the superior qualities of JELL-O, 
but the best evidence is the approval of the millions of 
American housewives wiio serve JELL-O desserts. 

J5I1-0 costs lOc. at all grocers. 

Illustrated Recipe Book free. 

The Genesee Pure Food Co., Le Roy, N. Y. and Bridgeburg, Canada. 




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JAK22 60 



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